Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 29th Oct 2012 18:14 UTC
Google While Microsoft is unveiling all about Windows Phone 8, Google ruined the party a little bit by 'leaking' all about Android 4.2, the Nexus 10 tablet, and the new Nexus phone, the LG Nexus 4. There's some pretty awesome stuff in here from Google - except for the fact the devices themselves are kind of ugly.
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RE[2]: Nexus 4
by Alfman on Wed 31st Oct 2012 18:48 UTC in reply to "RE: Nexus 4"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

saso,


WorknMan: "NO removable battery"

saso: "Again, nobody cares. We've moved on."

That's not true at all, electronic waste is a major problem and it's exacerbated when manufactures engineer non-user serviceable devices.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Nexus 4
by saso on Thu 1st Nov 2012 11:00 in reply to "RE[2]: Nexus 4"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

That's not true at all, electronic waste is a major problem and it's exacerbated when manufactures engineer non-user serviceable devices.

I'm not talking about the environmental aspect. I agree with you that we are generating lots of waste, but the fact that batteries aren't replaceable doesn't really factor into people's decision to buy a phone anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Nexus 4
by Alfman on Thu 1st Nov 2012 15:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Nexus 4"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

saso,

"I'm not talking about the environmental aspect. I agree with you that we are generating lots of waste, but the fact that batteries aren't replaceable doesn't really factor into people's decision to buy a phone anymore."

Well, the sales numbers don't lie, you are right.

However a purchase of a non-battery-accessible device cannot be construed as a vote against having accessible batteries. It's a subtle distinction having to do with the granularity of choices offered.

When given no fine grained choice about the battery, consumers will buy them anyways. However given a choice we may very well learn that many consumers would prefer an accessible battery and would even be willing to pay a bit more for it.

It is plausible a manufacturer may been aware that consumers wanted battery access, and never the less decided to do away with it for selfish reasons like built in obsolescence.

Reply Parent Score: 2