Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 12th Nov 2012 15:56 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives Can you believe they've come this far by now? Once known as OpenBeOS, Haiku today announced the release of the fourth alpha for Haiku R1. It seems like only yesterday when BeOS died and OpenBeOS rose form its ashes, generating a new hope among the legions of avid BeOS fans. Now, almost twelve years later, we've hit the fourth alpha.
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In what sense...
by Jason Bourne on Mon 12th Nov 2012 21:42 UTC
Jason Bourne
Member since:
2007-06-02

You guys have this crush on BeOS, why? Why is the UI so better than others?

Reply Score: 1

RE: In what sense...
by djohnston on Mon 12th Nov 2012 22:07 in reply to "In what sense..."
djohnston Member since:
2006-04-11

Beauty is more than skin deep. The UI is rather plain looking by today's standards. But, the UI is not the most compelling feature for using Haiku. To quote from Haiku's site,

"Those of us who have used BeOS/ZETA in the past know the goodness of how extended attributes are for certain file types. The approach of having emails messages and contact information in individual files with attributes makes your data very portable and accessible even at the file manager (Tracker) level. You can, for example, switch your email client, and still have access to all your emails and contacts, as the data remains always the same."

You can read the rest at http://www.haiku-os.org/blog/koki/2007-05-08/settings_beos_style.

Many of the OS's capabilities are due to the 64bit journaling filesystem, which is capable of automatically indexing data and cataloging metadata.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: In what sense...
by koki on Tue 13th Nov 2012 03:32 in reply to "RE: In what sense..."
koki Member since:
2005-10-17

"Those of us who have used BeOS/ZETA in the past know the goodness of how extended attributes are for certain file types. The approach of having emails messages and contact information in individual files with attributes makes your data very portable and accessible even at the file manager (Tracker) level. You can, for example, switch your email client, and still have access to all your emails and contacts, as the data remains always the same."

You can read the rest at http://www.haiku-os.org/blog/koki/2007-05-08/settings_beos_style.


I wrote that, back in my Haiku days. :-) My geek days are over, but I still have a sweet spot for BeOS and Haiku. Congrats to all the Haiku folks for their latest release!

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: In what sense...
by moondevil on Mon 12th Nov 2012 22:35 in reply to "In what sense..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

BeOS was a kind of revival of the Amiga spirit.

An operating system for multimedia applications, which explored the hardware capabilities much more than the contemporary desktop systems.

Nowadays it is too late, but it could have become Mac OS X.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: In what sense...
by v_bobok on Tue 13th Nov 2012 06:39 in reply to "RE: In what sense..."
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

OSX is bloated and slow, though very capable of handling multimedia

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: In what sense...
by henderson101 on Tue 13th Nov 2012 18:12 in reply to "RE: In what sense..."
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

It wasn't really. Amiga was just another OS. Most of the key developers at Be, especially to begin with, were Mac based or ex-Apple. Benoit Schillings, Steve Sakoman, Erich Ringewald and Bob Herold were at any rate. I'll quote myself here: http://www.osnews.com/thread?514205

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: In what sense...
by Soulbender on Wed 14th Nov 2012 11:06 in reply to "RE: In what sense..."
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Did anyone actually use the Amiga for anything but gaming, demos and tracking?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: In what sense...
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 12th Nov 2012 23:24 in reply to "In what sense..."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Why not try it yourself and find out? It's not like it will cost you any more than a few minutes of your time and bandwidth to download a file, a blank CD-R (or CD-RW, or USB flash drive...), and the electricity needed to power your computer when running the OS...

If you don't like it, just reboot, chuck the CD into the trash and forget all about it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: In what sense...
by Splinter on Tue 13th Nov 2012 02:03 in reply to "In what sense..."
Splinter Member since:
2005-07-13

The full C++ API was also a dream. Well thought out and complete in a time where the Windows API was a cobbled together piece of sh*t.

Multi-threading, filesystem events etc were all there and working. There was also the mandatory call IsComputerOn so your program could know if the computer was running. Paired with IsComputerOnFire you could handle significant failure conditions right within your code. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: In what sense...
by henderson101 on Tue 13th Nov 2012 12:24 in reply to "RE: In what sense..."
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

The C++ was actually a blessing and a curse. It tied Be to a very specific compiler for a very long time. It was hard to expand the API without a lot of planning or creation of second versions of the classes (they seem to have been doing this for the BeIA project as there's a second namespace with different classes in the Dev kit I've used.) Adding methods to existing classes was costly as they reserved only a number of "slots". Using them up would cause a lot of issues.

The API being multi-threaded was cool, but it forced a lot of uncomfortable synchronisation on to the developer. There was no middle ground - you either adapted or your app sucked. It had the potential to make really simple operations very complex.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: In what sense...
by Morgan on Tue 13th Nov 2012 02:19 in reply to "In what sense..."
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

djohnston pretty much has it covered, but personally I don't like the UI all that much. I tend to span the deskbar and turn on single window browsing in Tracker whenever I do a new installation.

What drew me to BeOS in the first place (besides being an alternative to Windows 98 and GNU/Linux) was the amazing multimedia software that ran on it, as well as the simplicity and power of the file system. I could achieve a very productive and comfortable workflow that simply wasn't possible on any other OS at that time.

Since then I've found OS X to be close to my ideal both for audio work and for my general workflow, and recently KDE on GNU/Linux is manageable for the latter. But I have a feeling that a mature Haiku will be what I've really been looking for.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: In what sense...
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 13th Nov 2012 14:50 in reply to "In what sense..."
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Oh, back in the late 90's Windows just terminally sucked. Mac OS Sucked. Linux on the desktop wasn't pretty ( visually or functionally). But BeOS... was beautiful and it worked. I only used it on x86, but it fully supported my hardware with zero configuration-- including my tv tuner ( which barely worked in windows without crashing it every 10 minutes). It was awesome. Plus it gave you a haiku in the web browser when an error occurred, that was so cool. Never got around to exploring the api much, just a few hello world programs, plus a port of my senior research program that modeled various high energy particle reactions.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: In what sense...
by zima on Tue 13th Nov 2012 20:02 in reply to "RE: In what sense..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

my senior research program that modeled various high energy particle reactions.

That made me wonder: is that what your avatar sort of shows, is it somehow related?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: In what sense...
by Tuishimi on Tue 13th Nov 2012 15:01 in reply to "In what sense..."
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

I enjoyed working with the database-like file system. Scripting and creating some dynamic website code in Python was fun too... I just loved how it all worked, looked, FELT...

When Haiku can do everything R5 (with the beta networking update) could do I will definitely consider moving back to it even ditching my games on Windows (or at least making Windows secondary).

The only API work I did was to add syntax plugins for an editor... so that doesn't really count.

Reply Parent Score: 2