Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 12th Nov 2012 15:56 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives Can you believe they've come this far by now? Once known as OpenBeOS, Haiku today announced the release of the fourth alpha for Haiku R1. It seems like only yesterday when BeOS died and OpenBeOS rose form its ashes, generating a new hope among the legions of avid BeOS fans. Now, almost twelve years later, we've hit the fourth alpha.
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Comment by rain
by rain on Tue 13th Nov 2012 14:18 UTC
rain
Member since:
2005-07-09

I will always have a soft spot for BeOS. It was my main OS for several years and it has taken me quite some time to "get over" that it didn't make it.
And I'm impressed that the Haiku developers have been able to replicate it so well. Really good job!

That said, Be had a hard time getting developers to work with the OS back then, and I can't imagine how hard it would be to convince them today. I really can't see a future for Haiku in terms of application support. Which makes it quite pointless for me where I am now (doesn't make it pointless for everyone though).

However, if anyone has the desire to make Haiku a popular OS, then now is the time. It could be a perfect foundation for a mobile OS and it is quite possible for a dedicated team to catch up with the others.

I'm not saying that taking over the world is the purpose of Haiku. Just saying that if someone wants it to be big, then now is pretty much the last chance.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by rain
by zima on Tue 13th Nov 2012 20:51 in reply to "Comment by rain"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Be had a hard time getting developers to work with the OS back then, and I can't imagine how hard it would be to convince them today. I really can't see a future for Haiku in terms of application support. Which makes it quite pointless for me where I am now (doesn't make it pointless for everyone though).

Luckily, for quite a few people their PC is now mostly a WWW terminal, plus the basics of ~office suite, media player, IM, BT. Haiku should cover such needs relatively easily, eventually.

But I doubt it has much chance at mobile. First, it's a very desktop-focused OS. Second, that battle is probably already won, or nearly so (it's an open question if there's really a place for a third mobile ecosystem - and if yes, that will be probably MS...)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by rain
by rain on Tue 13th Nov 2012 21:25 in reply to "RE: Comment by rain"
rain Member since:
2005-07-09

Luckily, for quite a few people their PC is now mostly a WWW terminal, plus the basics of ~office suite, media player, IM, BT. Haiku should cover such needs relatively easily, eventually.


I think we will see a majority of the "basic users" moving to tablets in the next few years.

But I doubt it has much chance at mobile. First, it's a very desktop-focused OS. Second, that battle is probably already won, or nearly so (it's an open question if there's really a place for a third mobile ecosystem - and if yes, that will be probably MS...)


Yes, there are two leaders in the mobile world at the moment. But I don't think that it's impossible to gain market share there. People are not looking at phones and tablets the same way they look at desktops. In fact, they seem to be switching between ecosystems without much thought about it as long as the basic apps are there. And getting the basic apps on a mobile device at this stage is much easier than on the desktop given the simple nature of them.

I don't really see how haiku is any more desktop oriented than Windows 8 is. Sure, you'd need to remake the app server and add the hardware support. But apart from that it should make a fine base for a mobile os I think.

Reply Parent Score: 1