Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 24th Nov 2012 17:52 UTC
Editorial Do you depend on your computer for your living? If so, I'm sure you've thought long and hard about which hardware and software to use. I'd like to explain why I use generic "white boxes" running open source software. These give me a platform I rely on for 100% availability. They also provide a low-cost solution with excellent security and privacy.
Thread beginning with comment 543122
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: I couldn't agree more
by lucas_maximus on Sat 24th Nov 2012 21:14 UTC in reply to "I couldn't agree more"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Switched from WindowsXP to Linux over 10 years ago. I've never looked back. And, you're right about the hard drive swap from one motherboard to another. I've done the same several times now.


What happens if the hardrive goes?

You can be back up and running with Windows or any other operating system if you plan for it.

Even if the video driver at bootup is for a different card than the original, the OS will switch automatically to a generic vesa or other generic driver.


Windows Vista/7 and 8 can also deal with that. I have had the same Windows installation cross motherboard hardware ... the only common denominator was the processor was intel.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: I couldn't agree more
by djohnston on Mon 26th Nov 2012 16:15 in reply to "RE: I couldn't agree more"
djohnston Member since:
2006-04-11


What happens if the hardrive goes?

You can be back up and running with Windows or any other operating system if you plan for it.


I think you're grasping at straws here. I wasn't referring to a dead hard drive. I was referring to moving a hard drive from one motherboard to another and proceeding without interruption, as indicated by this portion of Howard's article:


My motherboard died last summer. I removed the boot disk from the dead system and plopped it into another, then booted that Linux instance on the target computer. Problem solved! Windows won't let you do this.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I couldn't agree more
by helf on Mon 26th Nov 2012 18:50 in reply to "RE[2]: I couldn't agree more"
helf Member since:
2005-07-06

You actually *can* do this with windows, I have done it numerous times.

Guess what, I did this with BeOS even longer ago.

No one cares. This shouldn't be a feature point on a chart. It should be assumed that a system is designed well enough to cope with such a change.

I just recently did the swapping to get both crunchbang and windows 7 installed on an old laptop of mine that doesnt support USB booting ;) "hurray".

Reply Parent Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Still can be done on modern Windows without many problems other than that you run with no Hardware acceleration for a while.

Reply Parent Score: 3

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Shame Office 2010 wasn't as smart as Win7 with regard to moving. I can kind of accept that I can't install a Pro license on the new machine without unregistered the license from the old machine. One licese, one install; fair enough.

What I can't understand is why the uninstall program does not unregister the license during the process or even provide the option. And if you do uninstall, you can't re-install back on that same machine again because your license is flagged as already registered. WTF.. it's the machine it was registered to run on in the first place. So, I can't re-install or move the license to a new machine without calling Microsoft on the phone and asking permission? This is a Pro license for F sakes.

Now, I have to go make a phone call and try not to throw up in my mouth during.

Edited 2012-11-26 18:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: I couldn't agree more
by telns on Mon 26th Nov 2012 18:12 in reply to "RE: I couldn't agree more"
telns Member since:
2009-06-18

Windows Vista/7 and 8 can also deal with that. I have had the same Windows installation cross motherboard hardware ... the only common denominator was the processor was intel.


I've done this often.

One Windows 2K3 array I've moved hardware three times without a hitch. My current desktop switched pretty much everything, including processor mfg, when I cloned it over to the new one. It worked fine, from big stuff all the way down to the color calibration of my monitors.

I think it is a bit of a myth that Windows can't deal with this. From Windows 2000 on, it seems pretty solid. I never tried it on desktops back in 3.x - 9x days, so I can't comment. Maybe it didn't work back then. I did move NT4 around few times, and it worked OK, but I did not do that often.

Edited 2012-11-26 18:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I couldn't agree more
by helf on Mon 26th Nov 2012 18:51 in reply to "RE[2]: I couldn't agree more"
helf Member since:
2005-07-06

It actually works with 9x as well. Windows *can* be REALLY finicky, but, in general, it works fine if you do it correctly.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

They even had "Hardware profiles in previous versions of Windows."

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: I couldn't agree more
by darkcoder on Tue 27th Nov 2012 15:36 in reply to "RE[2]: I couldn't agree more"
darkcoder Member since:
2006-07-14

I think it is a bit of a myth that Windows can't deal with this.


They can deal fine as long as you stay in the same architecture. Example upgrade from an old Intel Core DUO to an i7, or from an AMD Athlon II/Phenom to a FX.

But if you do cross-architecture upgrade, then good luck with that.

Linux does not only survive that, it will boot without problems due to kernel having most drivers build in. The only one that will probably need re installation is the proprietary video driver and only if the card chip family changes (ie AMD->NVIDIA)

Edited 2012-11-27 15:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: I couldn't agree more
by mbharat on Tue 27th Nov 2012 22:51 in reply to "RE: I couldn't agree more"
mbharat Member since:
2008-06-19

I once swapped memory sticks and changed the video card on my desktop. And the windows xp started asking me to get new license. The original point made by the author is very valid. Windows OS license is tied to the hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: I couldn't agree more
by tylerdurden on Wed 28th Nov 2012 02:48 in reply to "RE: I couldn't agree more"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


Windows Vista/7 and 8 can also deal with that. I have had the same Windows installation cross motherboard hardware ... the only common denominator was the processor was intel.


Yeah, but depending on what license you have for windows, transferring the same OS installation among different machines may or may not be legal.

Something which is a non-issue with Linux or BSDs, for example.

Technically, however, both Linux and Windows are a mixed bag when it comes to having an installation work across different machines/configurations. At least from personal experience.

Edited 2012-11-28 02:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2