Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 24th Nov 2012 17:52 UTC
Editorial Do you depend on your computer for your living? If so, I'm sure you've thought long and hard about which hardware and software to use. I'd like to explain why I use generic "white boxes" running open source software. These give me a platform I rely on for 100% availability. They also provide a low-cost solution with excellent security and privacy.
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Comment by lucas_maximus
by lucas_maximus on Sat 24th Nov 2012 21:24 UTC
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Another possibility is to keep Windows but replace Microsoft's proprietary development environment. Leave the ever-shifting sands of Microsoft's frameworks in favor of open source IDEs, programming languages, tools, and databases. Some companies score good savings while producing excellent apps with WAMP (Windows + Apache + MySQL + PHP/Perl/Python ).


What a load of rubbish (highlighed).

Sorry most Microsoft produced languages and APIs work in most cases from Windows 2000 to 8 with very little problems ... I still have VB6 apps that work perfectly well.

.NET has been solid since version 2 (.NET 1.1 still worked fine with Windows 7/2008 R2). SQL Server is backwards compatible to SQL 2000.

While there is nothing wrong with Open source stuff, why move your existing and working code for the sake of it?

Edited 2012-11-24 21:32 UTC

Reply Score: 7

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by Alfman on Sat 24th Nov 2012 22:32 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

lucas_maximus,

"I still have VB6 apps that work perfectly well."

Funny, I still have nightmares from vb6 active-x hell.

For the most part I think backwards compatibility for *userspace* code in windows is remarkably stable, especially given the 64bit transition. It's not perfect though, and old things are breaking. I was at a shop that was heavily invested in vb6 & activex for numerous products. One of my roles involved deploying these on new platforms, and they definitely encountered numerous incompatibilities, incurring high maintenance costs.

As a side note: citrix is workaround many of the compatibility problems we encountered, albeit at some expense.


"NET has been solid since version 2"

.net apps are not without occasional problems either, sometimes they install on one system but not another (ie when both are winxp3). I gave up installing one .net app on a new win7 home computer even, but I never solved the problem (probably a localised issue).


"While there is nothing wrong with Open source stuff, why move your existing and working code for the sake of it?"

That's just it though, I wouldn't ask people to convert for no reason. If something works, then great (no sarcasm here). But when old things start breaking, regardless of who's at fault, it may be worth looking around at what else exists and pre-emptively avoid another proprietary locked in solution.

Reply Parent Score: 9

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I could do with a lot more backward compatibility from win7 to Office 2003 (compatibility mode?.. rubbish). It is the bane of my existence supporting users right now.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Comment by lucas_maximus
by snorkel on Sun 25th Nov 2012 05:18 in reply to "Comment by lucas_maximus"
snorkel Member since:
2006-03-16

To avoid lock in by M$ that's why.
.net kind of sucks for desktop applications, Lazarus and free pascal is much better in my book.
Even for web based you can do all the same stuff with Python and Cherrypy for example or flask or whatever.
The corp IT departments are full of morons...They make decisions based simply by something they read in a magazine or read online with no clue on how things really work. They love to give massive amounts of cash
to M$ and they love M$ SQL server when PostgreSQL is clearly better for just about everything, same thing with web servers, they drool over IIS, and then wonder why it was hacked into in a matter of hours....

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

.net kind of sucks for desktop applications

Really? .net apps sure beats Java apps at least. Then again, gouging your eyes out with a spork beats using Java apps on the desktop.

Lazarus and free pascal is much better in my book.


Sure, and you could do the same in asm if you wanted but that's not the point.

Even for web based you can do all the same stuff with Python and Cherrypy for example or flask or whatever.


Sure, you could do it with Perl CGI's too.

The corp IT departments are full of morons

True that

and they love M$ SQL server when PostgreSQL is clearly better for just about everything


Better is a relative term. it's not necessarily "better" if I have to spend a lot of money and time porting existing apps to it.


they drool over IIS, and then wonder why it was hacked into in a matter of hours....


It's not 2001 anymore, IIS isn't horribly vulnerable these days.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

They love to give massive amounts of cash
to MS and they love MS SQL server when PostgreSQL is clearly better for just about everything, same thing with web servers, they drool over IIS, and then wonder why it was hacked into in a matter of hours....


You start to lose credibility when you say MS ...

IIS has less vunerabilities reported recently than Apache.

Microsoft SQL Server is pretty good. The IDE for it is one of the better SQL Editors that I have used. PostgreSQL only has compatibility last time I checked with Microsoft SQL 7, not sure about Oracle with PL/SQL.

Edited 2012-11-26 12:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

OMG... try selling Lazarus and Free Pascal to any large company... you'll be laughed out of the board room. You might just get away with Delphi by mentioning Borland, but even Delphi has dropped like a stone in popularity.

Disclaimer: I did just over 10 years worth pro commercial Delphi development between 1997 - 2008 for 4 different employers(Banking sector 3 years, Consultant/Trainer 2 years, Logistics Back office 2 years,Patient Transport/Security Patrolling/Auditing 3.5 years.) Delphi jobs dried up and there is no real call for it any more. We need to be realistic here.

Reply Parent Score: 8

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I don't know that it's the entire IT department. Granted, the tech staff can only do what management allows and.. and there's your problem usually.

Reply Parent Score: 2

benali72 Member since:
2008-05-03

The places I've worked have lots of difficulty keeping up with all the changes in Microsoft's software. Say you left for five years and came back to your employer... how much of your code would still be in place? How much would have had to be rewritten? Most of it, I bet, whether it's Microsoft or open source tools you used.

Reply Parent Score: 3