Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 24th Nov 2012 17:52 UTC
Editorial Do you depend on your computer for your living? If so, I'm sure you've thought long and hard about which hardware and software to use. I'd like to explain why I use generic "white boxes" running open source software. These give me a platform I rely on for 100% availability. They also provide a low-cost solution with excellent security and privacy.
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RE[3]: Slashdot Circa 1999
by Alfman on Sun 25th Nov 2012 17:37 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Slashdot Circa 1999"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

ze_jerkface,

"Well you don't know much about LAMP development then. What developers would like to use and what they build against for business reasons are two entirely different things. CENT/RHEL is the standard for web servers and going outside it increases the conflict risk. That means higher support costs."

I think Soulbender would already agree with your complaints about PHP, as do I. But you are exaggerating the difficulty of using alternate linux distros for the server. It's practically plug and play no matter which distro you use. Also, I haven't had much trouble replacing apache with alternates like lighttp either, just because it's not officially supported doesn't mean it doesn't work.

I'm not saying we should step outside of "supported" installations willy nilly, but if there is a good reason to then it's certainly feasible.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[4]: Slashdot Circa 1999
by ze_jerkface on Sun 25th Nov 2012 18:22 in reply to "RE[3]: Slashdot Circa 1999"
ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22

But you are exaggerating the difficulty of using alternate linux distros for the server. It's practically plug and play no matter which distro you use.


Yes it is plug and play for a basic setup and the same is true for Windows Server and FreeBSD. Want CPANEL? It's only supported in CENT/RHEL. Sure you can probably get it working in Debian but then all it takes is a single module break down the line to make you wish you stayed in the norm. LAMP software is more dependent on CENT/RHEL than it was 5 years ago. The LAMP world is not some hippie software exchange; it's filled with commercial companies and developers that have limited resources and can't afford to test in every distro.


just because it's not officially supported doesn't mean it doesn't work.


That doesn't fly in the business world. You don't stake your reputation on unsupported software.

Edited 2012-11-25 18:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Slashdot Circa 1999
by Soulbender on Mon 26th Nov 2012 01:46 in reply to "RE[4]: Slashdot Circa 1999"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Want CPANEL? It's only supported in CENT/RHEL.


That's because Cpanel is a horribly badly written piece of software and a disgrace to system admins everywhere.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[5]: Slashdot Circa 1999
by Alfman on Mon 26th Nov 2012 04:37 in reply to "RE[4]: Slashdot Circa 1999"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

ze_jerkface,

"LAMP software is more dependent on CENT/RHEL than it was 5 years ago."

I have to disagree, I personally haven't had a single problem working on lamp projects across multiple distros (PHP's own version specific breakages aside). Is there actually something specific that's been giving you trouble? If so, maybe we can help? If not, then what exactly is your evidence that LAMP is dependent upon RH/CENT?


"The LAMP world is not some hippie software exchange;"

If we take "P" to stand for PHP, it might be a bit hippie actually ;)

"it's filled with commercial companies and developers that have limited resources and can't afford to test in every distro."

So what? It doesn't contradict what's been said. Just because a LAMP package isn't supported on X doesn't mean it can't run on X. I've been routinely developing LAMP software on my ubuntu desktop and deploying it to various servers including CENT/Debian for years and not once has that caused a problem. There was once even a mac server.

I swear that I did not know this before today, but my own shared web hosting provider is running Debian. It's never even mattered enough for me to check before. It has little impact on what I do.


Of course, these distros have different approaches to administration and installing packages. But I'd hope that anyone who chooses to use distro X is familiar with how to manage X packages. If that's too much to ask, then you are really setting the bar low.



Edit:

"That doesn't fly in the business world. You don't stake your reputation on unsupported software."

Well, alot of independent developers (particularly web developers) have a job precisely because the open source code clients want to use is *unsupported* and they want *us* to support it. Not to overstate it, but I hope we can agree there's a bit of truth to this?

Edited 2012-11-26 04:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6