Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 28th Nov 2012 16:32 UTC
Gnome Not even GNOME itself could ignore the GNOME 3 criticism for much longer. "As part of the planning for the DropOrFixFallbackMode feature, we've decided that we will compile a list of supported gnome-shell extensions. This will be a small list, focused on just bringing back some central 'classic' UX elements: classic alt tab, task bar, min/max buttons, main menu. To ensure that these extensions keep working, we will release them as a tarball, just like any other module."
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RE: comment
by bouhko on Thu 29th Nov 2012 10:38 UTC in reply to "comment"
bouhko
Member since:
2010-06-24

It's basically a case of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it": Most users were perfectly productive with Gnome 2 and would have been happy if they just fixed the remaining bugs. It's also the reason a lot of people are switching to Xfce : it's very similar to Gnome 2, it just works and doesn't get in your way.

Now, the thing with Gnome 3 is that they are trying to do much more than just a window/desktop manager. They are trying to build a whole ecosystem of apps with some new UI paradigms. The new UI is mostly targeted at tablet-style use cases, where you have one app fullscreen. The problem is, a lot of Gnome 2 users are engineers/scientists/technical users with multiple screens and a lot of windows.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: comment
by pandronic on Thu 29th Nov 2012 16:03 in reply to "RE: comment"
pandronic Member since:
2006-05-18

It's basically a case of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it": Most users were perfectly productive with Gnome 2 and would have been happy if they just fixed the remaining bugs.


That's interesting, but do those people see themselves using Gnome 2 in another 10 years? What about progress?

Now, the thing with Gnome 3 is that they are trying to do much more than just a window/desktop manager. They are trying to build a whole ecosystem of apps with some new UI paradigms. The new UI is mostly targeted at tablet-style use cases, where you have one app fullscreen. The problem is, a lot of Gnome 2 users are engineers/scientists/technical users with multiple screens and a lot of windows.


From what I've read about the subject, I've got the feeling that the devs wanted to appeal to a broader audience. Unfortunately, it seems that all they've managed to do was just to drive away the audience they had.

I think Cinnamon should have been a Gnome 3 project (the fallback option).

Edited 2012-11-29 16:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: comment
by TechGeek on Thu 29th Nov 2012 18:02 in reply to "RE[2]: comment"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

Like I said above, I don't care that they changed or progressed. But when the devs go out of their way to make sure you can't change the desktop from the way they want it, then they are going too far. There is no reason why Gnome couldn't ship the desktop the way they want it, but still make it easy for people to change it to their needs. Instead, they did the opposite, to preserve branding. That way you always know a Gnome desktop when you see it.

Reply Parent Score: 4