Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 30th Nov 2012 21:54 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "I was prepared to write that the Windows 8 interface was forcing unnecessary touchscreen controls on people who wouldn't appreciate them, particularly if they were simply grafted onto a traditional laptop. But the more I've used Windows 8, despite its faults, the more I've become convinced that touchscreens are the future - even vertical ones." I can see his point. I, too, have often felt the desire to touch regular and laptop displays, especially when doing things like photo and video.
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I never bought the 'gorilla arm' anyway
by lazar on Sat 1st Dec 2012 00:39 UTC
lazar
Member since:
2008-12-10

Since the days I've been using the Psion 5 I realized - touching screens is useful and works for me.

I think the 'gorilla arm' fairy-tale is just used to not release a mixture between a MacBook and an iPad otherwise it would screw with the product portfolio.
But maybe Apple will do just that - it's not the first time.

Reply Score: 3

Dave_K Member since:
2005-11-16

Since the days I've been using the Psion 5 I realized - touching screens is useful and works for me.


I liked the touch screen on my Psion 5 too. But that's because it was a handheld device with a 5.6" diagonal screen. A screen that lay back when opened, rather than being vertical like a typical laptop/desktop.

The Psion also had a convenient stylus that popped out the side, avoiding fingerprints on the screen. Its EPOC interface was designed for stylus use, and unlike Metro had a finger-unfriendly information density.

"Gorilla arm" comes from reaching out and holding your arm elevated to use a large vertical screen. It's specifically an issue with desktop screens, and to a lesser extent laptops. Nobody is claiming that touch screens are unsuitable for tablets and palmtops.

Reply Parent Score: 1

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

"Gorilla arm" comes from reaching out and holding your arm elevated to use a large vertical screen. It's specifically an issue with desktop screens, and to a lesser extent laptops.

But that's not what you'd usually do with a laptop - your elbow placed right in front of the "keyboard half" can offer support (try it, even if none of your laptops has touchscreen). And this news is about laptops, not desktop screens.

Reply Parent Score: 2