Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 1st Dec 2012 09:05 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes I was on vacation to the US last week, and a few technology-related things stood out to me. One, the in-flight entertainment things aboard international Delta flights are absolutely terrible. Worst software I've ever used, and many of them were plain broken. iPads/Android tablets please, Delta. Second, there were more employees than customers in the Las Vegas Apple Store. Since there were a reasonable amount of customers, there were even more employees. It looked ridiculous. Are they all like that? Three, using a Windows Phone 8 device to mooch off an Apple Store's wifi is strangely satisfying. Four, there are a lot of technology commercials on US TV, and they are all corny as hell. Two iPads playing piano? Children holding a PowerPoint presentation to convince their parents to switch mobile plans? Seriously? Is this what this industry has come to? Five, it's pretty clear iPads and iPhones are way, way, way more popular in the US than in The Netherlands. You see them everywhere, and people display them so openly. It was jarring. In The Netherlands, I always feel as if people are ashamed to take devices out of their pockets in the first place. No wonder US-based writers like Gruber and Arment think Apple dominates everything - if you rarely leave the US, it seems as if they do! Six, and this is not technology related at all but I want to get it off my chest because us Europeans could learn a thing or two from it: Americans are the nicest people I've ever had the pleasure of dealing with. I knew this from my existing American friends and from my previous trip to the US (Texas, ten years ago), but it bears repeating. Open, interested, kind, helpful, considerate, and nice. Not exactly qualities I'd ascribe to most of my fellow countrymen. Alright, as you were!
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Cultural
by JAlexoid on Sat 1st Dec 2012 10:49 UTC
JAlexoid
Member since:
2009-05-19

Open, interested, kind, helpful, considerate, and nice. Not exactly qualities I'd ascribe to most of my fellow countrymen.


That is usually the case how locals treat locals in most countries - in a very uninterested manner. Americans range from open(SF) to closed and self-centered(LA).
But here's the fact - Europeans are no different.
It's all regional and openness increases towards foreigners. There's a lot of nations in Europe that I can't call as open cultured as others. There are regions in US that I can't call as open cultured as others.
(Also, Dutch, you're not as tolerant to foreigners as you like to present yourself.)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Cultural
by StuS on Sat 1st Dec 2012 23:31 in reply to "Cultural"
StuS Member since:
2012-12-01

Haha. Ok, I can see that, but, being an LA native, and having been in SF & LA a bit I would say the faults are:

LA - downtown/hollywood - superficial & obsessed with status as measured in local values, but they all know it, and are a bit cynical about it all at the same time. Can be very candid and self-aware and even helpful in the right environment.

WLA - laid back, open, give you space to do whatever you want. So if you want help, you need to ask - I think most see this as politely giving you your space, but it can seem cold at times. It can actually BE cold at some time. If someone needs help & doesn't know how to ask, it can be very bad. But the people who help are often very helpful. I don't really like Venice, but you see the rich and the homeless mix fluidly in Venice, and getting along pretty well, considering.

ELA - Gets a bad rep. I'm not too familiar with it, but from what I've seen - there is crime, but it's not as bad as outsiders often think. My GF grew up on the same street as one of the NWA members, and said they just seemed like guys in a band. Some good food to be found as well. Crime can be a problem, and the police can be a problem, but not as bad as what I've seen in Detroit :O

SF-city-tech-people - the bad ones (and they are legion) are one big drawback of SF city. Constantly marketing themselves and their great new idea. Constantly pushing how focused on self-improvement they are, and how this makes them better. Can seem totally oblivious to how self-improvement and selfishness is pretty much the same thing.

SF / city - nice small community in general, but liberal, and open to everything liberal, but not to anything else. Note that I am very liberal, and still get annoyed at this. Can be a lot more self-righteous than anywhere in LA. (LA is WAAAY to cynical to be self-righteous, pretentious, yes, but not self-righteous). Can be paternalistic and judgmental. Can (rarely, but notably) be myopic to the point of stupidity in refusing to see the contradictions of their views. Hard to get some space sometimes (as measured in CA, not by NYC or Boston standards ;) ).

SF / Peninsula - chill, much more normal than the city. Not nearly so self-righteous. Reminds me of the nice bits of LA. A little more homey (could be seen as boring), but the nice people are definitely worth it. I'll take nice people in a slightly more boring environment any day.

I'm not really as familiar with the North Bay, Berkeley or Oakland. Berkeley seems a lot like the city, though.. and is Oakland SF? Hint: it's a trick question, and says more about who is giving the answer ;)

Not going to cover SFV or SGV in LA. LA is BIG.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Cultural
by Lennie on Sun 2nd Dec 2012 02:22 in reply to "Cultural"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Also, Dutch, you're not as tolerant to foreigners as you like to present yourself.


Yes, our tolerance is in decline. :-(

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Cultural
by Laurence on Sun 2nd Dec 2012 14:28 in reply to "Cultural"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


That is usually the case how locals treat locals in most countries - in a very uninterested manner. Americans range from open(SF) to closed and self-centered(LA).
But here's the fact - Europeans are no different.
It's all regional and openness increases towards foreigners. There's a lot of nations in Europe that I can't call as open cultured as others. There are regions in US that I can't call as open cultured as others.
(Also, Dutch, you're not as tolerant to foreigners as you like to present yourself.)

In my admittedly limited experience, I do think Americans take services more seriously than Europeans.

I know that some countries over here almost feel like working in such industries means that the customers owe them a debt of gratitude. Where as in America, it's all about keeping the customer happy at all costs.

I'd imagine that would have a significant impact on how tourists view Americans.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Cultural
by kwan_e on Mon 3rd Dec 2012 03:34 in reply to "RE: Cultural"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

Where as in America, it's all about keeping the customer happy at all costs.


I'm all for terrible customer service:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9PSg0sQyfs

The flip side of American customer service is that it turns American tourists into the most fussy tossers who demand the most outrageously stupid things:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcTBNY0hEaY

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Cultural
by JAlexoid on Mon 3rd Dec 2012 23:49 in reply to "RE: Cultural"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Totally disagree. They like to pretend that they care about the service. American pretentiousness is what drives me nuts there.

The biggest tip I ever gave(35% of a massive bill) was to a waiter that without cracking a smile worked his ass off to make sure that we got what we wanted.(This was the only time I gave a tip of more than 15% in US)

In fact, I rarely see that attitude in US.(And more attitude of asking for a tip at places like Starbucks...) All over Europe you just get a reasonable service. In US they throw in that pretentious smile and expect an extra 10%...

Reply Parent Score: 3