Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 4th Dec 2012 09:50 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "For a seventh consecutive month, the Samsung Galaxy S III is the most popular smartphone in the United Kingdom. The data compiled by uSwitch is based on live searches, pre-orders, as well as postpaid sales. Curiously, Apple's current smartphone flagship is not even second. The iPhone 5 is outperformed by its predecessor, whose lower price and improved contract offers helped it remain appealing. The Samsung Galaxy S II completes the quartet at the top. The rest of the top ten smartphones is entirely an Android party. It includes the Google Nexus 4, who entered the rankings a solid fifth. The second half of the top ten includes the Samsung Galaxy Ace, Samsung Galaxy Note 2, Sony Xperia U, HTC One X, as well as the Samsung Galaxy Ace 2." This is getting ridiculous, and it's not good for the market. For the love of Fiona, people, buy something that's not Android. I don't want to live in an Android-dominated smartphone world.
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Please list what's wrong with Android...
by rklrkl on Tue 4th Dec 2012 12:34 UTC
rklrkl
Member since:
2005-07-06

It seems a little strange to say you don't want to live in an Android-dominated world without giving reasons. If, for example, you said the same of Windows (which is clearly nowhere near the best desktop OS technically), I'd agree with you. But what exactly is wrong with Android to justify a comment?

Remember that until recently, iOS was the OS leader on mobile touchscreen devices (particularly on tablets, less so on phones), so would you say the same about iOS if it returned to its preivous position?

What I hate about Windows is that it really only gained its dominance via volume discounts to OEMs (with veiled threats to lose their discounts if they sold desktops with another OS or, shock horror, without an OS at all). Technically, Windows is a poor OS, but people suffer it because that's all they've known for decades now thanks to the Windows monopoly.

Android hasn't done the same thing - the only real pressure tactic Google employed was that they wouldn't give access to Google Play if you attempted to release an Android device outside the OHA (i.e. an unauthorised fork). Considering Google Play is a vital money-making stream (30% of app costs go to Google), this is not an unreasonable request.

I think the only other issue you might have is that Google has little to no control over what carriers do with their releases, even though they're part of the OHA. The custom skinning by carriers has caused no end of grief (often worse than the vanilla Android experience and delays releases often for months) and is partly to blame for the wide range of Android releases still active in the wild.

However, at the end of the day, the Android ecosystem has produced a wide range of phones (different sizes, some with keyboards) of a varying spec (from cheap and cheerful to iPhone-beating) and price. I know that I'd far rather have a choice of phones (and phone manufacturers) to buy from than be stuck with just one model. It creates competition, which spurs on pricing and innovation - two things which Apple haven't been good at after the launch of the first iPhone.

Reply Score: 2

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

But this won't change the situation where most people are stuck with something that is an appliance, because most OEMs don't care about upgrades.

To be honest most people don't care anyway.

And Google is a corporation, like every corporation they have to answer their shareholders and they won't play nice forever.

I remember the days when Microsoft was the place to apply for, if you wanted to do cool stuff.

Reply Parent Score: 4

sgtrock Member since:
2011-05-13

Microsoft was NEVER the place to work for if you wanted to do cool stuff. Doing cool stuff just has never been in their DNA. At best, it could be said that you wanted to work for a company whose goal was to be acquired by Microsoft because that's how Microsoft has always acquired cool stuff to sell.

Reply Parent Score: 1

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Honestly?

1) The Play Store has apps that are as bad as any malware you might want to find on the internet. They literally use all of the old malware tricks (install extra apps/short cuts, tell you there is a virus on your device.)

2) Android 4.2, despite the hype can be choppy at extremely unreliable.

3) Battery life is a joke. The OS still has a hard time managing the battery.

4) Background tasks are a mess. If you don't constantly manage your apps and background tasks you battery is toast in a few hours. Apps install background tasks like crazy.

I could go on, I won't.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Honestly?

1) The Play Store has apps that are as bad as any malware you might want to find on the internet. They literally use all of the old malware tricks (install extra apps/short cuts, tell you there is a virus on your device.)


Never encountered any of these, neither have my Android-using friends. Doesn't mean they don't exist - but it does *usually* mean the problems are overblown - like antennagate.

2) Android 4.2, despite the hype can be choppy at extremely unreliable.

3) Battery life is a joke. The OS still has a hard time managing the battery.

4) Background tasks are a mess. If you don't constantly manage your apps and background tasks you battery is toast in a few hours. Apps install background tasks like crazy.

I could go on, I won't.


Not only are these all disputable, they've got nothing to do with the Play Store.

Reply Parent Score: 5

gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

While I don't disagree on you about Android domination being a bad thing, as a user of both Android and iOS, I have to disagree with some of your points

1) The Play Store has apps that are as bad as any malware you might want to find on the internet. They literally use all of the old malware tricks (install extra apps/short cuts, tell you there is a virus on your device.)

Yes, there's a lot of crap on the Play Store (seriously, how did anything to do with that Santorum idiot get through the vetting?) and there are some apps that will social engineer you into a world of inconvenience , but most of these "malware" reports are seriously overblown, imho. I haven't even encountered anything bad, despite side-loading a couple of times. Then again, I suppose I know what I'm doing; meaning I actually check online when an app catches my interest, though the main reason I do that is because of device fragmentation (wanting to make sure something works on my device) not security.


2) Android 4.2, despite the hype can be choppy at extremely unreliable.

Not sure about older hardware, but on my Nexus 7 it's been a peach. Sure, there's some lag here and there, but I could say the same for my gf's iPad2. iOS is still generally a smoother experience, but the gap ain't that big now. On older hardware Android 4.2 would probably suck a tad, but iOS 6 on an iPhone 3GS or iPhone 4 ain't all sunshine either from what I've heard, despite Apple disabling new features on old handsets.


3) Battery life is a joke. The OS still has a hard time managing the battery.

Again, not on the hardware I have. With the apps I run, my Nexus 7's battery life seems comparable to my partner's iPad 2 (which runs an even less diverse set of apps), give or take 1/2 an hour. If it's constant browsing, then the iPad2 edges it, but not by much. Yes, Android isn't as energy-efficient as WinPhone or iOS, we all know that, but it doesn't suck as much as it used to.


4) Background tasks are a mess. If you don't constantly manage your apps and background tasks you battery is toast in a few hours. Apps install background tasks like crazy.

While I'm sure some apps misbehave or just like working too much for their own good (I'm looking at you, Google Currents), in my case I've hardly had to manage background tasks all that often. Only time I actually double check what's running is after the odd game or two, partly because one game I played had a habit of staying open till an update fixed it. Android memory management still isn't great, though.

Do I like Android? F*ck no!! I think it's Crippled-Linux the same way I think OS X is Crippled-BSD, I still don't trust Google with my info, and the amount of turd in the Play Store makes even Arch's AUR seem like a golden prairie, but it's not as terrible as you make it out to be at this point in time, on newish hardware at least.

Edited 2012-12-04 17:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

The custom skinning by carriers has caused no end of grief (often worse than the vanilla Android experience and delays releases often for months) and is partly to blame for the wide range of Android releases still active in the wild.


I keep hearing this, but I keep asking where all the non-carrier/non-Nexus based Android tablets are that are running stock Android and with unlocked bootloaders. Nobody seems to have an answer, except maybe those bottom-of-the-barrel cheap Chinese pieces of shit tablets that nobody wants. The fact is that Google is ENCOURAGING this vendor bloatware bullshit, so I'm putting the blame squarely on them.

As far as I'm concerned, there are only 3 Android devices currently on the market:

- Nexus 4
- Nexus 7
- Nexus 10

The rest are suck-ass, FrankenAndroid devices.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

If, for example, you said the same of Windows (which is clearly nowhere near the best desktop OS technically), I'd agree with you. But what exactly is wrong with Android to justify a comment?
[...]
What I hate about Windows is that it really only gained its dominance via volume discounts to OEMs (with veiled threats to lose their discounts if they sold desktops with another OS or, shock horror, without an OS at all). Technically, Windows is a poor OS, but people suffer it because that's all they've known for decades now thanks to the Windows monopoly.

You seem to have some complex about the success of Windows - which actually is not bad on the desktop. It came to dominate because it was (and right now still is) the best of choices http://www.osnews.com/thread?522221

It all happened when Microsoft was still small and cool, in the times of Win 3.x. The period of MS pressure on OEMs was after the fact.

People like Windows despite its shortcomings, deal with it; they like it to the point of pirating it on a massive scale - more than alternatives.

Reply Parent Score: 2