Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 4th Dec 2012 09:50 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "For a seventh consecutive month, the Samsung Galaxy S III is the most popular smartphone in the United Kingdom. The data compiled by uSwitch is based on live searches, pre-orders, as well as postpaid sales. Curiously, Apple's current smartphone flagship is not even second. The iPhone 5 is outperformed by its predecessor, whose lower price and improved contract offers helped it remain appealing. The Samsung Galaxy S II completes the quartet at the top. The rest of the top ten smartphones is entirely an Android party. It includes the Google Nexus 4, who entered the rankings a solid fifth. The second half of the top ten includes the Samsung Galaxy Ace, Samsung Galaxy Note 2, Sony Xperia U, HTC One X, as well as the Samsung Galaxy Ace 2." This is getting ridiculous, and it's not good for the market. For the love of Fiona, people, buy something that's not Android. I don't want to live in an Android-dominated smartphone world.
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RE[3]: Well
by henderson101 on Tue 4th Dec 2012 16:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Well"
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

it was your choice to allow installations from unverified sources. That you had to make the choice (to be able to use the other app store) is a technical detail to be solved.


Either Amazon need a mechanism to allow the option to be turned on, or Google need to allow other App stores. We digress... you missed one salient point - the app in question was from the Google Play Store, so therefore the Google Play Store is opening up users to dangerous apps. My daughter is 7, but I'm not. Would I have installed the app? No. Do I have to lock down my device and prevent her from enjoying using it? Why should I have to? I've certainly never had this happen to an iOS devices I own and this stinks.

The behavior of Apple and Microsoft with their platforms does not have a technical reason and therefore will not be solved.


With all due respect, bullshit. Opening up naive users to dangerous apps is completely unacceptable.

Apple is getting more insane every day.


Exaggeration. The situation changes very little "daily".

But I am very disappointed of Microsoft. They always had the philosophy of an open platform,


Hyperbole.

although using other means of getting ahead of competition (e.g. undocumented API features...).


Undocumented API.. LOLACOASTER! Read Raymond Chen's blog. You'll fairly quickly understand why the undocumented API's existed (hint, Microsoft frequently had a gung-ho attitude to adding new features and programmers that purposefully fudged, hacked around and patched their way through features they were too lazy to fix or had a personal vendetta to include/remove.)

At least they never got into the way of the user.


Cry me a river. Nothing you've mentioned so far is "getting in the way" of the user. Nothing.

But this changed already with Windows 7 (talking about DRM "features" here).


God forbid there should be any security or any way to protect your digital assets! God forbid!! Clueless.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Well
by -oblio- on Tue 4th Dec 2012 18:35 in reply to "RE[3]: Well"
-oblio- Member since:
2008-05-27

Now really, you're also avoiding the elephant in the room. Diversity, liberty of choice.

Where can I get a native Opera browser for iOS? Or Firefox for iOS? Or VLC for iOS? You get the point.

Yes, if you are a parent you should be given parental controls to make sure your child doesn't install dangerous apps. After all, you have to take care of your children. It's like not allowing them near guns so that they don't get hurt.

Blocking everyone from using supposedly dangerous apps is not the way to go.

But, to each his own.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Well
by tomz on Tue 4th Dec 2012 21:48 in reply to "RE[3]: Well"
tomz Member since:
2010-05-06

God forbid there should be any security or any way to protect your digital assets! God forbid!! Clueless.


Remember they aren't YOUR digital assets. It can only inconvenience you, prevent you from using your own stuff, have all your books, music, or whatever evaporate at their whim.

God forbid there should be any security to prevent them from snooping on your phone calls, SMS, emails, browsing or searches...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Well
by cyrilleberger on Wed 5th Dec 2012 07:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Well"
cyrilleberger Member since:
2006-02-01

Do I have to lock down my device and prevent her from enjoying using it? Why should I have to? I've certainly never had this happen to an iOS devices I own and this stinks.


Logic fails: you don't want to lock down the device for your daughter but you praise a system that is locked down as being superior.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: Well
by henderson101 on Thu 6th Dec 2012 12:14 in reply to "RE[4]: Well"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Logic fails: you don't want to lock down the device for your daughter but you praise a system that is locked down as being superior.

I'm very sorry, but I don't see iOS as locked down. I've never been prevented from doing anything I've needed to do with iOS. I administer remote machines via VPN and RDP, I download PDF's and read them on device, I edit documents and seamlessly transfer them to my desktop via iCloud, Google docs or dropbox. I code games in Codea. I edit movies, I make music, I animate sprites for games. I edit photos, I draw comics. What is it that I'm being prevented from doing here? Nothing I'd *want* to do on an iPad.

Edited 2012-12-06 12:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2