Linked by Howard Fosdick on Thu 6th Dec 2012 05:26 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes With computers now shipping with UEFI Secure Boot enabled, users of any OS other than Windows 8 will want to know how to circumvent it. Jesse Smith of DistroWatch tells how he did it here. The Linux Foundation describes its approach here. If you want to boot an OS other than Windows 8, you'll want to figure this out before you buy that new computer.
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RE[5]: I did my homework
by Alfman on Thu 6th Dec 2012 16:02 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: I did my homework"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

Bill Shooter of Bul,

Yea, the trouble is that non-windows computers are a niche commodity. It's often difficult to get a no-os computer from a brand name vendor with the benefits of scales of economy. They don't want the trouble of supporting non-windows users when 95% of the customers are windows users and the remaining 5% will buy the windows computers anyways to wipe them.

This ultimately results in less competition selling non-windows computers making that segment even more niche than it already is.

I build my own desktops, but for laptops I still don't have a good solution for my vendor/hardware/price/os requirements.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Yeah, I understand that scale has something to do with it. But with everyone outsourcing all the work to foxconn and the like, at some point I'd imagine those to diminish a bit. As a company you still need to make some money and the price you can get on laptops will depend on the number you order, but the barier to entry is much lower than the days where you'd have to do all the assembly yourself.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: I did my homework
by westlake on Fri 7th Dec 2012 05:35 in reply to "RE[6]: I did my homework"
westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

Yeah, I understand that scale has something to do with it. But with everyone outsourcing all the work to foxconn and the like, at some point I'd imagine those to diminish a bit.


The economies of scale in Windows extend to marketing and sales, service and support.

Then there is the lucrative after-market in sales of Windows hardware, software and peripherals.

The Windows-only THQ Humble Bundle is closing in fast on a $4 million return from 700,000 sales, with five days left to go.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I did my homework
by lucas_maximus on Thu 6th Dec 2012 18:28 in reply to "RE[5]: I did my homework"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

As I said, get Dell Latitudes or Lenovos (Thinkpad) with Intel chipsets and you are usually okay.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: I did my homework
by Alfman on Thu 6th Dec 2012 19:35 in reply to "RE[6]: I did my homework"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

lucas_maximus,

"As I said, get Dell Latitudes or Lenovos (Thinkpad) with Intel chipsets and you are usually okay."

Dells website shows some laptops are compatible with Ubuntu, but it forces me to buy a version of windows, which is part of the problem Bill_Shooter_of_Bul and I were talking about.


Incidentally, I had a horrible experience with dell. I tried buying a large stash of hard drives for a NAS, but the website informed me that bulk orders couldn't be processed through the website and I'd have to call to place the order. I called and they quoted me a price that was higher than on the website, they spoke to a manager to approve the advertised price, and I gave them my credit card info and I thought my order was placed. But after several days I hadn't received any kind of confirmation and the drives hadn't arrived. I tried calling the rep but there was no answer. I called sales, and they told me my rep was on vacation and that they couldn't find my order, but they didn't want to ship other drives if my original order had already gone out, they had me wait for the original guy to get back. He forgot to place the order.

Now I know accidents happen and this is probably not typical, but my order was delayed by two weeks because they didn't handle it, and to top it all off I did not get so much as an apology from them. I've stuck with newegg since, however they don't offer any linux computers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I did my homework
by zima on Tue 11th Dec 2012 00:40 in reply to "RE[5]: I did my homework"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

the trouble is that non-windows computers are a niche commodity. It's often difficult to get a no-os computer from a brand name vendor with the benefits of scales of economy. They don't want the trouble of supporting non-windows users [...]
I build my own desktops, but for laptops I still don't have a good solution for my vendor/hardware/price/os requirements.

But those big PC makers do sell no-OS (or Linux) computers... But I take it you still haven't found your local equivalent of ceneo.pl product & online shop catalogue? (you know, "no OS" & "Linux" filters for http://www.ceneo.pl/Laptopy;017P8-250094-250095.htm few hundred results; looks like all big vendors present at the first page... PL->EN GTranslate works decently)

Edited 2012-12-11 00:41 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: I did my homework
by Alfman on Tue 11th Dec 2012 04:24 in reply to "RE[6]: I did my homework"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

zima,

You keep mentioning this foreign example as though it's proof that the situation is equal everywhere, but it is not. The few niche vendors who specialise in linux can charge more than their hardware is worth because big venders with scales of economy hardly ever bother selling linux or no-OS machines.

I understand you are tired of listening to us whine about paying the ms tax, but you should still recognise that it is a legitimate complaint and isn't something we're just making up.

Reply Parent Score: 2