Linked by Howard Fosdick on Thu 6th Dec 2012 05:26 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes With computers now shipping with UEFI Secure Boot enabled, users of any OS other than Windows 8 will want to know how to circumvent it. Jesse Smith of DistroWatch tells how he did it here. The Linux Foundation describes its approach here. If you want to boot an OS other than Windows 8, you'll want to figure this out before you buy that new computer.
Thread beginning with comment 544450
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[8]: I did my homework
by lucas_maximus on Thu 6th Dec 2012 19:41 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: I did my homework"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

lucas_maximus,

"As I said, get Dell Latitudes or Lenovos (Thinkpad) with Intel chipsets and you are usually okay."

Dells website shows some laptops are compatible with Ubuntu, but it forces me to buy a version of windows, which is part of the problem Bill_Shooter_of_Bul and I were talking about.


They don't use the license, it is discounted to fuck, so I have no idea why people care. I run fedora on my Dell D430 (it is old yeah, but unbreakable it seems).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[9]: I did my homework
by Alfman on Thu 6th Dec 2012 20:24 in reply to "RE[8]: I did my homework"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

lucas_maximus,

"They don't use the license, it is discounted to fuck, so I have no idea why people care. I run fedora on my Dell D430 (it is old yeah, but unbreakable it seems)."

Paying OEMs for windows licenses only to discard them after sale isn't not a good way to convince OEMs to offer what we'd like in the future. If anything, it inflates windows sales numbers compared to linux. This further increases microsoft's stranglehold over OEMs, and decreases the perceived demand for linux as a niche.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[10]: I did my homework
by lucas_maximus on Thu 6th Dec 2012 20:53 in reply to "RE[9]: I did my homework"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Paying OEMs for windows licenses only to discard them after sale isn't not a good way to convince OEMs to offer what we'd like in the future. If anything, it inflates windows sales numbers compared to linux. This further increases microsoft's stranglehold over OEMs, and decreases the perceived demand for linux as a niche.


Look I don't wish to be rude, but the downloads of Windows 7 beta dwarfed the desktop linux market share within a week ... Even if it got upto about Macintosh levels of usage, it still really going to be cost effective to support.

There are a few reasons for this.

* Which version of Linux should you support (and they do have to support it) ... RHEL (far more expensive than a Windows license), Ubuntu (new version every six months and the LTS is a joke), CENTOS (free but not official etc etc etc).

* Which version of the kernel do you support with apps and drivers that aren't OSS (lets face it there is always going to be some).

Fragmentation is a major issue for anyone wanting to support Linux. The only examples that have done it well (nvidia) has basically replaced large amount of X, or they statically link everything in the install folder.

Also if Dell want to supply some sort of Warranty or Support contract they have to do the following things.

* Either fork their Own version of the distro.
* Rely on a 3rd party to supply support (the distro owner)
* Retrain the support channels (1st, 2nd, 3rd line support) in something which can be constantly changing.

Edited 2012-12-06 21:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2