Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 13th Dec 2012 00:23 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "What are the chances that we'll see something with the finesse of the One X with stock software down the road? 'The Nexus devices are Google’s lineup,' explains Kodera, 'but in general, we're very proud of HTC Sense, and we'd like to continue shipping it on every device.' Not exactly encouraging." Big letdown. Not unexpected, but a letdown still. I will never again buy a non-Nexus device.
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Re:
by kurkosdr on Thu 13th Dec 2012 13:12 UTC
kurkosdr
Member since:
2011-04-11

Then you have nobody to blame but yourself. You choose a lower price and you pay with inconvenience. I'm not saying that this is a bad trade-off per se, but it is important to realize that YOU, the customer, made a choice here.


WHAT inconvenience? The carrier I have a contract with (Cosmote) is subsidizing all the phones that are available in the retail market (yes, even Nexuses), and offers phones that are SIM-unlocked (yes, with a contract) and get their upgrades directly from the manufacturer. There is another carrier here (Wind) with similar pro-customer practices, so I am good. The problem of customers being forced to choose between a limited range of (locked) phones selected by the carrier is mainly an American and UK problem. The problem with phones being SIM-locked and also not receiving a upgrades directly from the manufacturer is mainly an American and UK problem, and for customers of Vodafone.

Also, I want to have a certain amount of "mobile" data for each month. I can either price list price (which is expensive here), or sign a 12 month contract and pay much less, and get a (SIM-unlocked) phone for less. What should I do? Hmm... let me think...

Subsidizes are not a bad habit if the phone that is subsidized is unlocked.

I have a better idea. Disallow carriers to sell/rent phones. Without crosssubsidies covering costs becomes harder and phone

So, we should stop carriers from offering deals some of us want, just to satisfy some nerdy ethics that say the phone shall be sold unsubsidized? I don't think so If you want to stop the American and UK problem of carriers offering a limited range of (locked) phones, how about a law that forces carriers to offer unlocked phones and subsidize everything on the market?

Since we are re-writing the US law system here, let's at least propose laws that most people will like.

Edited 2012-12-13 13:14 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Re:
by B. Janssen on Thu 13th Dec 2012 19:46 in reply to "Re:"
B. Janssen Member since:
2006-10-11

Almost missed you down here, sorry.

WHAT inconvenience? [...] Subsidizes are not a bad habit if the phone that is subsidized is unlocked.


Good for you. But originally we were discussing the market conditions in the USA, which leave you the choice between a cheaper crappy experience or a more expensive good experience. I understand that in your country things are different, which is, again, awesome for you and your country. But going all Adam Savage on me and trying to substitute the premises of the thread you posted in with your own will not magically make your argument sustainable under the original premises.

However, it's good to hear that in some countries things are different, even if I wonder why and how the carriers are subsidizing any phone. Are your contracts so expensive or what?

So, we should stop carriers from offering deals some of us want, just to satisfy some nerdy ethics that say the phone shall be sold unsubsidized? I don't think so If you want to stop the American and UK problem of carriers offering a limited range of (locked) phones, how about a law that forces carriers to offer unlocked phones and subsidize everything on the market?

Yes, that's still a terrible idea. Everybody likes his things cheap, me too! So why don't we force restaurants to subsidize meals, car manufacturers to give away their cars for free and while we are at it, why don't we pay everybody an above average income?

OK, I'm snarky, sorry. What I'm trying to tell you here is that the money you spend must come from somewhere (even if the recent events in our financial markets suggest otherwise) and if you believe that carriers subsidize certain (or even any) handsets out of the goodness of their heart, I've got news for you.

Since we are re-writing the US law system here, let's at least propose laws that most people will like.

Haha, good one. How about "free hookers for everyone?"

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Re:
by zima on Sun 16th Dec 2012 17:00 in reply to "RE: Re:"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

However, it's good to hear that in some countries things are different, even if I wonder why and how the carriers are subsidizing any phone. Are your contracts so expensive or what?

Is it hard to imagine that your carriers just don't give you a very good deal? (say, they might be even ~cooperating, colluding in a cartel way)

BTW, most of the 5+ billion mobile subscribers own their phones, and are on prepaid - no contract. That alone makes your market a bit atypical.

Also, two Opera reports:
http://www.opera.com/smw/2012/05/
http://www.opera.com/smw/2010/09/
...in both of them US turns out to be most expensive.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Re:
by JAlexoid on Fri 14th Dec 2012 12:24 in reply to "Re:"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

The problem of customers being forced to choose between a limited range of (locked) phones selected by the carrier is mainly an American and UK problem.

How good that Apple is there to fix that issue... oh wait! Apple is the one that is extending that practice outside of US to countries that have long stopped having locked devices(A contract with an ETF is good enough in reality)

Also, stop with the subsidies! You get a loan on your device. You get a higher priced contract for longer - you get a higher loan. Terminate your contract early - pay off the difference.

Hiding the price of a phone behind - $200 now and $90 for the next 24 months isn't a positive thing for a free market.

Edited 2012-12-14 12:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3