Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 15th Dec 2012 19:11 UTC
In the News "Peers and scientists including Professor Stephen Hawking are once again pushing for an official pardon for codebreaker Alan Turing. Turing's death from cyanide poisoning in 1954 was ruled a suicide, coming after his conviction for gross indecency at a time when homosexuality was illegal." The fact that he still hasn't been pardoned is an utter disgrace.
Thread beginning with comment 545400
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: fat lot of good
by BluenoseJake on Sun 16th Dec 2012 14:38 UTC in reply to "RE: fat lot of good"
BluenoseJake
Member since:
2005-08-11

Your logic is horribly, horribly wrong. Those types of laws are bad, and people suffered under them. Those cases must be heard, and people must be compensated. If the British government can't handle the cost of repairing the damage, then too bad for them, they were oppressing their own people, for no good reason.

Your logic belittles the struggles that marginalized groups have been fighting for hundreds of years, be it homosexuals, or blacks, or women's rights(or countless others). All of those groups had to break bad laws as part of the fight for equality. Christ, the US wouldn't even exist if it was not for people breaking bad laws.

People persecuted under oppressive laws should be compensated and recognized for their struggle, no matter how hard it is on the governments of today. At the very least, it might show them that institutionalized oppression is too costly to maintain in the long run.

Turing was just being himself, and that should never be against any law.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: fat lot of good
by Laurence on Sun 16th Dec 2012 14:55 in reply to "RE[2]: fat lot of good"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Tell you what, when America compensates each and every persecuted coloured, homosexual and non-Christian citizen, then I'll consider taking your opinions seriously.

Until then, I think you have little place to tell me how my country should be run.



Turing was just being himself, and that should never be against any law.

I agree. But the issue is now bigger than whether the law was just. Which is my whole point and an issue you just ignored.

This is like the "think of the children" arguments where dangerously generalised laws are set.

Edited 2012-12-16 15:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: fat lot of good
by BluenoseJake on Sun 16th Dec 2012 15:14 in reply to "RE[3]: fat lot of good"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I'm not American, but your point is still asinine. Oh, if the Americans don't show remorse for their civil rights abuses then no one has too?

I'm Canadian, and we have our own shameful laws to deal with, and I totally support compensation for those affected by them. Japanese Canadians deserve compensation for internments in the 1940s. Natives deserve recognition and compensation for persecution in the 1950s, and so on, for ever, it seems.

Your Queen is my Queen, and I am ashamed of both our governments for their actions taken in the past.

Reply Parent Score: 2