Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 18th Dec 2012 00:03 UTC
Microsoft Microsoft has just responded to Google's move regarding Exchange ActiveSync. Sadly, instead of addressing the very real problems consumers are about to face, Microsoft starts talking about switching to Outlook.com.
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People have got the wrong idea
by Nelson on Tue 18th Dec 2012 07:12 UTC
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

To understand fully the extent of what Google is doing here, it is important to understand the journey that's led them to this point.

Google has licensed EAS. That means they at one point determined the EAS, not the DAV suite, fit the needs of users over what was available at the time.

Things change, and now Google feels that IMAP+*DAV is a better solution so they're transitioning. Granted, it's a rocky transition (Really, a few months notice? Stupid.), but it is one they're going through nonetheless.

This isn't Google moving to an open protocol, this is Google directly attacking Microsoft once the deck was stacked enough. If Google did not have Android, it wouldn't have the cojones to just shut out EAS.

So there's a lot of ways to read this: Google wanting to end free business services, save on licensing, injure Microsoft, etc.

I think its a little of each, but it isn't because Google had some sort of open standard loving epiphany. That's sort of pie in the sky.

Anyhow, I think Microsoft saw this coming. On Windows Phone 7, Gmail is automatically set up to use EAS to sync Contacts/Tasks/Calendar/Email

On WP8, Gmail uses IMAP..which caused a pretty nasty bug earlier this year (presumably due to Google's weird IMAP implementation, that some in these comments refuse to acknowledge exists). People have been dogging Google's IMAP implementation for years, but apparently its all head in the sand around here..

Reply Score: 2

l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

Anyhow, I think Microsoft saw this coming.


If that were so, they'd have implemented the stupid protocols and this whole thing would be a non-issue. So if they saw it coming, that means they chose not to implement, which is a somewhat different move. I'd say, based on the number of their phone sales, a bad one.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

"Anyhow, I think Microsoft saw this coming.


If that were so, they'd have implemented the stupid protocols and this whole thing would be a non-issue. So if they saw it coming, that means they chose not to implement, which is a somewhat different move. I'd say, based on the number of their phone sales, a bad one.
"

I don't think its a given, it may have been late enough in the dev cycle to be a no-go. I just can't imagine Google, a huge Microsoft EAS licensee doing something like this without giving prior notice. Corporations don't operate in a vacuum like that.

Windows Phone sales have been modest and picking up Quarter over Quarter for like a year. Windows Phone app vendors have seen explosions in app sales since Windows Phone 8 launched. There is clear momentum behind the platform. A fact many here conveniently refuse to acknowledge.

By all means, continue the meme though.

Reply Parent Score: 1

NeoX Member since:
2006-02-19

Agree with you here. This is just another crummy who cares about the customer move by google. They have done this plenty of times by dropping services and access to many other technologies that people got used to before. And they historically do not give you any transition time. A month is a joke.

I love this part of the headlined article:

It seems like Microsoft still thinks it's the number one technology company, with the ability to dictate the industry. Those days are gone, and Microsoft will have to learn to adopt other people's technologies - without being forced.


My question is isn't Google the new Microsoft? Are they not trying to dictate the industry by making these moves? Or is it ok because they like to use Open Standards? If EAS is in place and fills a need for a customer who cares if it is closed source.

I really don't get it. Google is acting just like MS here and no one seems to see it...

Edited 2012-12-19 00:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Or is it ok because they like to use Open Standards?


Yes. It's certainly infinitely better, certainly.

Reply Parent Score: 3