Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 18th Dec 2012 00:03 UTC
Microsoft Microsoft has just responded to Google's move regarding Exchange ActiveSync. Sadly, instead of addressing the very real problems consumers are about to face, Microsoft starts talking about switching to Outlook.com.
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RE[8]: Comment by lucas_maximus
by boing on Tue 18th Dec 2012 20:53 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by lucas_maximus"
boing
Member since:
2007-05-22

I know it is traditional for microsofties to equate "vapor/vague promise" with "shipping product/feature." But come on...

I hate to repeat myself; microsoft haven't provided a time table or any sort of corporate commitment for IMAP support. Furthermore their POP support is flaky and its use is discouraged explicitly (in the actual meaning of the word). And there is ZERO support for DAV suite, unless you use 3rd party plugins. So if my mail user experience depends on protocols that are not proprietary to microsoft, I'm basically shit out of luck with outlook.com. Which flies directly in the face of your narrative.


PS. You keep using that term "the fact of the matter" which does not mean what you want it to mean: "your personal opinion on the matter."


I agree completely. Actually if ActiveSync is better then the IMAP (with IDLE), CalDAV, and CardDAV solution, then what is their incentive to even support IMAP and the DAV protocols? Microsoft wants to lock people into EAS, not promote the alternative. Why? Simple, they want to sell Exchange (license $$), they want to sell ActiveSync [EAS] (license $$), and they want people to use Outlook.com (ads $$).

So actually Google is doing Microsoft a favor if you look at it, they are driving all these people locked into EAS to migrate over to Outlook.com. So really the company to benefit from Google removing EAS will be Microsoft. Google's mistake is even offering EAS to begin with for their FREE accounts. All they did is get people used to it and stuck on the proprietary EAS. Now that they are going to pull the plug on it, people don't want to loose it for free so they will migrate over to Microsoft services. Win for Microsoft.

I hope Microsoft supports IMAP and DAV, but I doubt they will. It is not in their best interests the way I see it. All the money to be made for them is in EAS, not offering open alternative solutions.

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