Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Dec 2012 10:19 UTC, submitted by anonymous
General Development "Computers are ubiquitous in modern life. They offer us portals to information and entertainment, and they handle the complex tasks needed to keep many facets of modern society running smoothly. Chances are, there is not a single person in Ars' readership whose day-to-day existence doesn't rely on computers in one manner or another. Despite this, very few people know how computers actually do the things that they do. How does one go from what is really nothing more than a collection - a very large collection, mind you - of switches to the things we see powering the modern world?"
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kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

If you want "idealization of the past", this is it:

In point of fact, I said that basic programming skills were a part of my generation's educational experience whether we went on and got degrees in computer science or not or whether we wanted it to be or not. Basic programming was not a f--king elective like it is today in most high schools. It was a part of my math classes. Get it? We couldn't just go out a buy ready made applications. We, therefore, wrote them ourselves using simple or not-so-simple programming languages.


Oh wait a minute, YOU wrote that. Silly me!

I find it precious that you're trying to argue that more people in the past knew how to program than today.

That is just beyond idiotic.

And there you were, in a previous comment telling me to get out of this OSNews mindset, when YOU are the one basing your cynicism on your own narrow view. Here's a hint, when you were in school and "had" to write your own programs, the other people in your school probably didn't have their own computers.

You're the one idealizing the past and than projecting it onto my prediction of possibilities.

Did you say somewhere you work in psychology? How about you psychoanalyse yourself and figure out how you missed the obvious fact you've projected yourself onto me and arguing against that projection? You may have serious issues with self hate.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TM99 Member since:
2012-08-26

Ah, the last resort of a feeble mind - the ad hominen attack at someone you don't even know.

Your reading comprehension is appalling.

You dream of a future where, as part of a standard preparatory education, computer programming will be as common as literacy and mathematics have become. You have stated that over and over in numerous posts.

I pointed out that the closest to that reality was in the infancy of home computing because during that phase of development to accomplish most things on the computer one had to know at least the rudiments of programming. There were no gui's. There were no app stores with a thousand ready made applications waiting to be downloaded.

So yes during that time in most public schools computer classes, which in my large cities public high schools was a part of the math department, involved actual programming. Yeah, maybe only Logo or Basic, but programming nonetheless. No, not everyone had a fucking computer in their homes. (You do love those non sequitors, don't you?!) No, not everyone went on to become computer scientists or aspired to work in the IT field.

By the late 1990's that had changed. Computer classes today in most public schools do not involve programming. They involve how to use productivity applications like office, multimedia applications like Garage Band, etc. Kids get iPads now for eBook reading instead of carrying around a backpack full of heavy textbooks. Yes, there are programming classes but, in general, not for the entire school. They are there as electives for the kids that want to and will go on to college or tech school in order to enter the IT field.

This trend is here to stay and frankly will get worse. Computers no longer need the general user to know anything about what is actually happening when they turn on the device. Single user devices like iPads with single application at a time usage patterns and automatic saving of files for use in other applications requires no thinking from the user. It has become like driving a car or using a microwave. Learn a few basic steps, and then you are fine.

I am not idealizing the past by simply pointing out, as you apparently were not there, that the time of computer programming being a requirement within general education has come and gone due to the evolution of the industry and marketing behind current computer usage for the masses.

I was laughing at the fact that what you dream about has already come and gone. It will not likely be back in vogue any time soon due to current realities.

I know you will simply not get it. That's fine. You will grow up someday presumably. While it has been 'interesting' debating with you, I am quite thoroughly done with this conversation with you.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

Ah, the last resort of a feeble mind - the ad hominen attack at someone you don't even know.

Your reading comprehension is appalling.


Says the man making the ad hominem.

You dream of a future where


Prediction != dream

, as part of a standard preparatory education, computer programming will be as common as literacy and mathematics have become. You have stated that over and over in numerous posts.


Where did I say standard preparatory education? I said basic knowledge of basic programming. I didn't say how or where it's taught. What was that you said about reading comprehension?

I pointed out that the closest to that reality was in the infancy of home computing because during that phase of development to accomplish most things on the computer one had to know at least the rudiments of programming. There were no gui's. There were no app stores with a thousand ready made applications waiting to be downloaded.


Bullshit. This never happened. In your own words, step outside of your own little world. Computers were not common, and you were in a very small group of privileged people, and you make it seem as if a sizeable percentage of the population had to write their own programs.

These days, any middle school kid can learn programming on their own through internet tutorials. And they do this today in greater numbers than when you did it, old man.

So yes during that time in most public schools computer classes, which in my large cities public high schools was a part of the math department, involved actual programming. Yeah, maybe only Logo or Basic, but programming nonetheless. No, not everyone had a fucking computer in their homes. (You do love those non sequitors, don't you?!) No, not everyone went on to become computer scientists or aspired to work in the IT field.


Thank you for making my point for me. You say I am having a "dream" about increased programming literacy. You basically are admitting that NOW compared to THEM, the trend of programming literacy is increasing.

They're only a non-sequitur to you because you are a moron who can't piece information together. Here's a hint:

COMPUTERS HAVE BECOME MORE COMMON PLACE. PROGRAMMING TOOLS HAVE BECOME MORE COMMON PLACE. PROGRAMMING TUTORIALS HAVE BECOME MORE COMMON PLACE. PROGRAMMING HAS BECOME EASIER.

The trend has been up.

By the late 1990's that had changed. Computer classes today in most public schools do not involve programming. They involve how to use productivity applications like office, multimedia applications like Garage Band, etc. Kids get iPads now for eBook reading instead of carrying around a backpack full of heavy textbooks. Yes, there are programming classes but, in general, not for the entire school. They are there as electives for the kids that want to and will go on to college or tech school in order to enter the IT field.


Again with the schools. Keep banging on about that old man. You only show your lack of lateral thinking - ABOUT THINGS THAT ARE ALREADY HAPPENING. People are self teaching outside of schools and universities.

This trend is here to stay and frankly will get worse. Computers no longer need the general user to know anything about what is actually happening when they turn on the device. Single user devices like iPads with single application at a time usage patterns and automatic saving of files for use in other applications requires no thinking from the user. It has become like driving a car or using a microwave. Learn a few basic steps, and then you are fine.


As menial jobs become automated, the only jobs that will be left are computerized ones that can't be cheaply automated.

I am not idealizing the past by simply pointing out, as you apparently were not there, that the time of computer programming being a requirement within general education has come and gone due to the evolution of the industry and marketing behind current computer usage for the masses.


Programming was never a general education requirement. Not everyone went to your fancy ass rich school, and not everyone in your school learnt programming. Stop dreaming that you were somehow in the norm, you over privileged jackass.

I was laughing at the fact that what you dream about has already come and gone. It will not likely be back in vogue any time soon due to current realities.


Come and gone?

More people today know about programming than when you were in school. The trend is an increasing one. This is a fact.

"Current realities" are complete bullshit. Can you get it through your moronic skull that "current realities" does not make a good predictor of tech trends. Can you get it through your moronic skull that naysayers have been wrong and you are making the same old arguments that the naysayers of old have said?

Reply Parent Score: 2