Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Jan 2013 23:42 UTC
Google So, Gingerbread has finally dropped below 50% of devices accessing Google Play. Ice Cream Sandwich has almost hit the 30%, and after six months, Jelly Bean (4.1 and 4.2) almost hit the 10%. Google's page listing these numbers is like a trainwreck in slowmotion.
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rklrkl
Member since:
2005-07-06

What surprises me is that Google hasn't set a simple cut-off point for releases if you're part of the handset alliance (which should obviously cover carriers too). Something like you can't release a new handset/tablet/whatever with a version of Android that's more than 6 months old.

Obviously, there needs to be an upgrade timetable too - something so that there's time points up to the 2 year mark (e.g. an upgrade at the 6/12/18/24 month mark or something like that).

Carriers will resist this hugely for 2 reasons, even if the phone is easily capable of running every Android release for the next 2 years. Firstly, it means they'll have a lot more models to update (maybe that would encourage them to release *less* models over time? HTC were terrible for this: almost every week would see a new model!).

Secondly - and this is a biggie - carriers love "disposable, non-upgradeable phones" (i.e. sealed in battery, no SD card slot expansion) because they can sell a new model to replace it and make a tidy profit. Allowing upgrades on older models of any sort (software or hardware) is against their selfish interests.

Reply Score: 4

SeeM Member since:
2011-09-10

What surprises me is that Google hasn't set a simple cut-off point for releases if you're part of the handset alliance (which should obviously cover carriers too). Something like you can't release a new handset/tablet/whatever with a version of Android that's more than 6 months old.


I have better idea. Lets slow down with new releases. Give me one good reason to upgrade from 2.3 to 4.0. When 2.3 is working fine with mail, browser, games, etc...

Reply Parent Score: 7

gilboa Member since:
2005-07-06

At last a comment that makes sense.
My SGS II is running JB 4.1.2 but my wife's Xperia X8 is running GB 2.3.7, both rooted and running non-standard ROMS.
The 2.3.7 on my wife's phone works just fine I simply cannot find a single reason for upgrade it to ICS or above.

Unlike iPhone android is running on just-about-any-type of device, from the low-end (Such as the X8) to the high end (Note II). As such it is very likely that no all will run the same OS version.

- Gilboa

Reply Parent Score: 3

VistaUser Member since:
2008-03-08

There is a big different between Android >=2.3 and Android 4.0+ IMO.

You can tell that the latter is far more polished and I think (I am not a programmer but I have read) the programming model for the fragments on 4.0+ is different from Gingerbread and lower - this enable supporting multiple screen sizes.

While old phones running Gingerbread is ok (as long as its secure), launching new phones means that new apps have to consider the old limitations for longer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

gtada Member since:
2005-10-12

I second the HTC comment. They pretty much abandoned the Flyer; I'll never buy another HTC.

Reply Parent Score: 1