Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Jan 2013 23:42 UTC
Google So, Gingerbread has finally dropped below 50% of devices accessing Google Play. Ice Cream Sandwich has almost hit the 30%, and after six months, Jelly Bean (4.1 and 4.2) almost hit the 10%. Google's page listing these numbers is like a trainwreck in slowmotion.
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why upgrade?
by project_2501 on Fri 4th Jan 2013 10:20 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

"+1" to SeeM's comment.

What's the reason Joe Public should care or worry about Android version?
I mean Joe Public, I don't mean the much smaller tech savvy or tech enthusiastic crowd.

If Joe publics email, web, phone, calendar, etc all work fine... what's the reason to upgrade, other than genuine bug fixes?

Sometimes an upgrade is a downgrade. The Huawei Ascend G300 went on sale in the UK for approx £100. It compared to phones costing more than twice as much at the time - still does. It came with Android 2.3 and it worked well. However Vodafone foolishly promised in public that it would "soon" receive an upgrade to ICS. It was very late - and after much hounding by techies, it arrived broken (things didn't work), unstable (things crashed/force closed) and slower (ui slower). The forums for the device have been ablaze and there are lot of users wanting to downgrade to Android GingerBread. In fact Vodafone/Huawei offered an official utility to do that.

Is the problem really for developers - not end users. Can developers really not develop apps/websites sufficiently agnostic of the client.... client dependencies are sooo 1990s...

Reply Score: 4

RE: why upgrade?
by Radio on Fri 4th Jan 2013 13:12 in reply to "why upgrade?"
Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

All the OS, even those who are managed very conservatively, receive at least security updates. More than the lack of updates to the next version, I fear a lot the lack of support of the current Android version of my phone. What is going to happen if one finds a gaping hole in Gingerbread, bad enough to allow self-propagating malware?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: why upgrade?
by sb56637 on Fri 4th Jan 2013 13:42 in reply to "RE: why upgrade?"
sb56637 Member since:
2006-05-11

Yep, this is a very sobering thought. Carriers don't care about their customers' security. They care about making money, and if the customer is locked into a long contract, they care even less about the state of the OS on the customers' devices.

I don't understand why Android doesn't simply separate the base system (kernel, drivers, Dalvick, whatever) from the userland. That would make it much easier to patch the core components if needed, and it would make it much easier to update or install a different userland system.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: why upgrade?
by Moochman on Fri 4th Jan 2013 14:40 in reply to "why upgrade?"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

If Joe publics email, web, phone, calendar, etc all work fine... what's the reason to upgrade, other than genuine bug fixes?


How about better user experience? Faster, more fluid performance? Support for brand-new apps that use brand-new features of the OS? ICS was a *huge* step forward in terms of the UI and in terms of developer API support in a number of areas (the new GUI widgets alone are worth switching platforms for developers).

Sometimes an upgrade is a downgrade... it arrived broken (things didn't work), unstable (things crashed/force closed) and slower (ui slower).


You're just proving that Android handset manufacturers are incompetent, not that upgrades are bad.

Is the problem really for developers - not end users. Can developers really not develop apps/websites sufficiently agnostic of the client.... client dependencies are sooo 1990s...


Um, asking users to buy a new device in order to upgrade their OS is sooo 1990s.... Everyone on every other platform *other* than Android has today come to expect free/cheap and easy upgrades *without* purchasing new hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 3