Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 5th Jan 2013 14:53 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y And so this situation is starting to get ridiculous - and consumers are, as usual, caught in the middle of it all. Google has just blocked Windows Phone devices from accessing Google Maps on their phones. In addition, it also seems Windows Phone users are now restricted to the basic HTML version of the mobile GMail website. While understandable from a defensive perspective - Microsoft's extortion scheme targeting Android device makers and all that - it's still a massive dick move that only hurts consumers. Update: the media attention has worked - Google is backpedalling, and will remove the redirect. "We periodically test Google Maps compatibility with mobile browsers to make sure we deliver the best experience for those users. In our last test, IE mobile still did not offer a good maps experience with no ability to pan or zoom and perform basic map functionality. As a result, we chose to continue to redirect IE mobile users to Google.com where they could at least make local searches. The Firefox mobile browser did offer a somewhat better user experience and that’s why there is no redirect for those users. Recent improvements to IE mobile and Google Maps now deliver a better experience and we are currently working to remove the redirect. We will continue to test Google Maps compatibility with other mobile browsers to ensure the best possible experience for users."
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UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

A few Google services not working on the default browser of one minor platform does not equal "breaking the web." At the most, it's breaking a few web pages on that platform's default browser. At the most, it's discriminating against that particular OS/browser combination in retaliation against Microsoft's crooked (as usual) moves.

You want to see truly breaking the web? Look no further than IE5/6, from none other than Microsoft themselves. That was a disaster for everyone; not just the users of some obscure platform but pretty much all competing browsers, both Windows-native and those on alternative platforms. Netscape was destroyed by it. Even IE users suffered from Microsoft's complete neglect of the browser after they pretty much annihilated all of their competition and security issues kept building up for Microsoft's own paying customers. Web developers were left with a stifled web, unable to move on until sometime after Phoenix rose from Netscape's ashes and eventually became Firefox.

Like I said--Microsoft has done far worse for the world than this little bitch-slap aimed directly at Windows-powered phones dealt by Google. It may not be the best thing to do, but at the same Microsoft has been guilty of crooked moves on a much grander scale, many times over.

I know, I know. Sometimes it's just convenient to ignore the past and purposely forget about who or what we're really dealing with here.

Edited 2013-01-05 22:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 8

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

The IE5/6 crap is a decade old.

Google using -webkit extensions and user agent sniffing to exclude people from using their service when it works without the user agent sniffing is wrong.

JUST f--kING WRONG.

Basically you are saying because it is Google and not Microsoft it is okay.

Edited 2013-01-06 00:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

The IE5/6 crap is a decade old.

So you're saying that it effectively never happened? Time has moved on and the entire Web as it stands today would not be any further at the present time in a parallel universe in which Microsoft had not done it? Sorry, but I'm just not seeing it. Microsoft has set the web back YEARS, and it really hasn't been all that many years ago that some serious progress has been made after it finally got back on track. Microsoft never gave the Web all those wasted years back; it had to go through a painfully slow process of correcting itself.

Basically you are saying because it is Google and not Microsoft it is okay.

No, if you'd read I'm only saying: You get treated by others in the same (or similar) ways that you treat them. And this really is just a little slap in the face compared to what Microsoft has done. I even said "it may not be the best thing to do."

Anyway, there is an update that Google is apparently reverting this behavior to please all five Internet Explorer on Windows Phone users. I find it ironic that according to Google's explanation, the whole thing was because the browser produced an inferior experience. Which, by Microsoft web browser standards, sounds highly plausible to me.

Edited 2013-01-06 01:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Google using -webkit extensions and user agent sniffing to exclude people from using their service when it works without the user agent sniffing is wrong.


What's Microsofts use of Silverlight on Bing maps, then? "Broken" or "Working as intended"?

Reply Parent Score: 4