Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 5th Jan 2013 14:53 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y And so this situation is starting to get ridiculous - and consumers are, as usual, caught in the middle of it all. Google has just blocked Windows Phone devices from accessing Google Maps on their phones. In addition, it also seems Windows Phone users are now restricted to the basic HTML version of the mobile GMail website. While understandable from a defensive perspective - Microsoft's extortion scheme targeting Android device makers and all that - it's still a massive dick move that only hurts consumers. Update: the media attention has worked - Google is backpedalling, and will remove the redirect. "We periodically test Google Maps compatibility with mobile browsers to make sure we deliver the best experience for those users. In our last test, IE mobile still did not offer a good maps experience with no ability to pan or zoom and perform basic map functionality. As a result, we chose to continue to redirect IE mobile users to Google.com where they could at least make local searches. The Firefox mobile browser did offer a somewhat better user experience and that’s why there is no redirect for those users. Recent improvements to IE mobile and Google Maps now deliver a better experience and we are currently working to remove the redirect. We will continue to test Google Maps compatibility with other mobile browsers to ensure the best possible experience for users."
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Comment by shmerl
by shmerl on Sun 6th Jan 2013 01:09 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

Why didn't Google have guts to ditch H.264 from Youtube and Chrome, to force Apple to start supporting open codecs like VP8 for WebM video? It seems strange that Google pushes Microsoft in that direction with CardDav and etc., but tolerates Apple's sabotage of open codecs on the Web.

Edited 2013-01-06 01:10 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by shmerl
by jared_wilkes on Sun 6th Jan 2013 02:21 in reply to "Comment by shmerl"
jared_wilkes Member since:
2011-04-25

In one scenario, they have leverage. In the other, they do not.

Despite androids thinking so, Google does not have enough power in the marketplace to get everyone else (in every facet of video, not just web) to abandon mpeg standards.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by ilovebeer on Sun 6th Jan 2013 05:25 in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

In one scenario, they have leverage. In the other, they do not.

Despite androids thinking so, Google does not have enough power in the marketplace to get everyone else (in every facet of video, not just web) to abandon mpeg standards.

You got that right. If they would have tried to force VP8 over h264 it would have been a disaster for them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by shmerl
by ze_jerkface on Sun 6th Jan 2013 06:06 in reply to "RE: Comment by shmerl"
ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22

Stop making excuses for them.

They claim to support open video codecs and then they bundle Flash with Chrome and leave it on by default. What is the excuse for that? That's not even a neutral position, they're encouraging the use of Flash by inflating the install base. It would be like a store stating they are against guns while handing out free bullets to every customer. I cannot believe how much of a pass Google gets just because they toss couch change at a few open source projects. They are the masters of open source p.r., basically the open source equivalent of green washing.

As I have said many times if anyone really thinks they are an open source luvin' company then write them a letter and ask them for the source to Google search or Google Docs.

Reply Parent Score: 3