Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 6th Jan 2013 23:00 UTC
Windows "It's taken longer than expected but it has finally happened: unsigned desktop applications run on Windows RT. Ironically, a vulnerability in the Windows kernel that has existed for some time and got ported to ARM just like the rest of Windows made this possible. MSFT's artificial incompatibility does not work because Windows RT is not in any way reduced in functionality. It's a clean port, and a good one. But deep in the kernel, in a hashed and signed data section protected by UEFI's Secure Boot, lies a byte that represents the minimum signing level." Good stuff. Very good stuff.
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RE[8]: Seems like a lot of work
by Alfman on Tue 8th Jan 2013 07:20 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Seems like a lot of work"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

Nelson,

Just my opinion mind you, but I think Microsoft will likely continue to keep win32s if only because 3rd party proprietary win32 applications are the strongest drivers of their market share. Maybe that will change, but I see no indication that a change is taking place today with winrt.

If MS did choose to abandon win32s all together, I suspect most commercial developers would rewrite their software using a portable toolkit and thus mark the end of microsoft's effective desktop monopoly.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Nelson,

Just my opinion mind you, but I think Microsoft will likely continue to keep win32s if only because 3rd party proprietary win32 applications are the strongest drivers of their market share. Maybe that will change, but I see no indication that a change is taking place today with winrt.


I wouldn't expect you to see a change given that Windows 8 has been out less than three full months. I'm speaking medium to long term, over multiple OS release cycles.

and the 3rd party Win32 apps being the drivers of marketshare, would in my opinion be replaced by 3rd party WinRT apps over many release cycles and iterations of the platform.

WinRT isn't this static thing, it will improve, it will become more flexible, and a better fit for a larger swath of the scenarios out there.


If MS did choose to abandon win32s all together, I suspect most commercial developers would rewrite their software using a portable toolkit and thus mark the end of microsoft's effective desktop monopoly.


It wouldn't be overnight, it'd be gradual and I think the inertial effect of Windows itself emphasizing WinRT over time would alleviate a lot of this.

Reply Parent Score: 3