Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 10th Jan 2013 17:10 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Nokia has just sent out a few preliminary comments about the company's performance during the fourth quarter of 2012. Nokia's figures are a good indicator for how well Windows Phone 8 is doing, and, in all honesty, I'm not exactly blown away. Apparently, neither was Nokia itself, since the company decided to redefine their Asha phones from feature phone to smartphone to prop up their smartphone sales figures.
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tylerdurden
Member since:
2009-03-17

Welcome to Marketing 101. ;-)

I am actually surprised with Nokia's symbian numbers for 2012: almost 22 million units sold, with basically zero marketing push. Whereas they only managed to ship over 13 million WP devices, and that is with a media/astroturfing blitz.

The transition in just one year has been startling: in Q1, Nokia shipped almost 12 million "smart" phones (10 million symbian + 2 million WP devices). In Q4 they have managed barely over 6.5 million of the same category (2 million symbian + 4.5 million WP devices). So basically, Nokia managed to halve their shipments in the most profitable phone bracket. That is a catastrophic result under most reasonable metrics.


I would be interested in knowing the terms of the licensing agreement between Nokia and Microsoft. I seem to recall they were operating on flat fees, so I wonder if Nokia sold enough WP units to break even with regards to OS licensing costs.

Luckily for Nokia their stock price has gone up a bit in the past few weeks, so all is not lost.

Reply Parent Score: 9

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The transition in just one year has been startling: in Q1, Nokia shipped almost 12 million "smart" phones (10 million symbian + 2 million WP devices). In Q4 they have managed barely over 6.5 million of the same category (2 million symbian + 4.5 million WP devices). So basically, Nokia managed to halve their shipments in the most profitable phone bracket. That is a catastrophic result under most reasonable metrics.


Exactly. It's astonishing that everybody is just parroting the press release gushing without actually looking at the figures.

Nokia's smartphone business HALVED this past year. HALVED. Arguing that's honky-dory is insane.

Reply Parent Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Nokia's smartphone business HALVED this past year. HALVED. Arguing that's honky-dory is insane.

OTOH quite a few people were arguing that Symbian handsets weren't really used as smartphones, anyway...

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


I am actually surprised with Nokia's symbian numbers for 2012: almost 22 million units sold, with basically zero marketing push. Whereas they only managed to ship over 13 million WP devices, and that is with a media/astroturfing blitz.


Symbian was established, had momentum, and had mindshare. It was definitely, and still is, falling off of a cliff.

People get lost in the numbers of the moment and don't look towards overall trends, in my opinion.


The transition in just one year has been startling: in Q1, Nokia shipped almost 12 million "smart" phones (10 million symbian + 2 million WP devices). In Q4 they have managed barely over 6.5 million of the same category (2 million symbian + 4.5 million WP devices). So basically, Nokia managed to halve their shipments in the most profitable phone bracket. That is a catastrophic result under most reasonable metrics.


But if you look at the trends, Nokia is growing Lumia and shedding Symbian.

They are in transition, this was expected. Anyone who didn't see this coming is dense.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

You're conveniently picking the epoch between Q3 and Q4 to make your "trend" claim work. Lumia's shipments in 2012 have been all over the map, they have gone up and down from quarter to quarter in 2012: 2.0M in Q1, 4.0 in Q2, 2.9M in Q3, and 4.4M in Q4. That is a "zig-zag" trend at best.

The numbers in context are indeed catastrophic: If you combine the two best quarters for lumias (Q2 and Q4) they still sold less than symbians in Q1.

Reply Parent Score: 5

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

So basically, Nokia managed to halve their shipments in the most profitable phone bracket. That is a catastrophic result under most reasonable metrics.

Though (Symbian for most of the time) smartphones never were exactly "the most profitable phone bracket" for Nokia, when compared to R&D costs (2 or 3 years ago only Symbian division R&D costs were higher than entire R&D of Apple).

Symbian wasn't what kept Nokia afloat all those years, it was S40; its new revision seems to have relatively positive uptake.

Reply Parent Score: 2