Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Jan 2013 23:15 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
General Development "Programming languages are living phenomena: They're born, the lucky ones that don't die in infancy live sometimes long, fruitful lives, and then inevitably enter a period of decline. Unlike real life, the decline can last many, many years as the presence of large legacy codebases means practiced hands must tend the code for decades. The more popular the language once was, the longer this period of decline will be."
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RE[4]: Comment by RareBreed
by Delgarde on Tue 15th Jan 2013 22:39 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by RareBreed"
Delgarde
Member since:
2008-08-19

It's true, pure functional is only a marginal improvement over impure functional. It's sort of like the distinction between weak and strong typing. But just as we prefer strong typing for the guarantees it gives us we should prefer pure functional to impure.



Disagree, pure functional is a serious step backward compared to a language that allow you to mix functional with procedural or OO techniques. Seriously, why should I prefer pure-functional when all that gives me is reduced flexibility?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by RareBreed
by ndrw on Tue 15th Jan 2013 23:23 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by RareBreed"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

"pure functional" = functional,
"functional" = maybe functional, maybe not - review the code.

OTOH, I agree that current pure functional languages are too limiting/inconvenient in practice.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by RareBreed
by satsujinka on Wed 16th Jan 2013 06:11 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by RareBreed"
satsujinka Member since:
2010-03-11

In very simple terms, you've gotten the core of my argument.

Personally, I don't find the limitations of a pure language to be particularly restrictive. I mean, I am most productive in Haskell.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by RareBreed
by satsujinka on Wed 16th Jan 2013 06:06 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by RareBreed"
satsujinka Member since:
2010-03-11

Exactly because it reduces flexibility. That's why I compared it to weak/strong typing.

Both strong typing and "pure functional" provide additional guarantees about the content of some object (values/variables and functions respectively.) In the case of pure functions, the guarantee is that they will always be referentially transparent and have no side effects. It's simply impossible to construct something which isn't. This is a valuable guarantee, at least for a compiler, due to the optimizations such a function allows.

Reply Parent Score: 2