Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 19th Jan 2013 14:22 UTC
Opera Software This is actually pretty big news - both exciting and tragic at the same time. Opera has revealed Opera Ice, its next mobile browser, to PocketLint. This new browser represent a big shift in both user interface as well as rendering engine, since it has a new, unique interface, as well as a new rendering engine... New to Opera, that is, as it's a WebKit-browser.
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Solution to a non-existent problem
by Wondercool on Sat 19th Jan 2013 15:14 UTC
Wondercool
Member since:
2005-07-08

Don't understand this at all. The home made browser engine is fast and portable. Why put effort into a me-too browser when the rest of the competition has deeper pockets to diversify on webkit?

It does not make any sense, effort should have been put into compelling features, not yet-another-webkit browser.

Totally baffled...

Reply Score: 5

woegjiub Member since:
2008-11-25

Perhaps they felt that the rendering engine was too much effort, and that they could get the same results regardless of engine, especially with weblog being open for them to add to.

That being said, the above doubts as to the validity of this news seem justified; opera have always led the pack with compliance and new rendering features.

Reply Parent Score: 2

steve_s Member since:
2006-01-16

Sadly "Opera leading the pack" with respect to compliance and new rendering features has ceased to be the case.

Opera were very late indeed to implement ECMAscript 5 (the new JavaScript standard), IIRC coming in behind Microsoft. Some modern CSS3 features such as 3d transforms, transitions, and animations which, whilst pioneered by WebKit, were all implemented on Firefox earlier.

It has seemed to me for quite some time that, with a few notable exceptions such as webforms support, Opera have been lagging behind the competition.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

They do not have a choice on iOS, they have to use WebKit or not have a browser at all. The same problem with Chrome or Firefox on iOS, they also have to use the Apple WebKit shit.

Reply Parent Score: 6

PresentIt Member since:
2010-02-10

Don't understand this at all. The home made browser engine is fast and portable. Why put effort into a me-too browser when the rest of the competition has deeper pockets to diversify on webkit?

Exactly. The competition has deeper pockets, so why should Opera spend tons of cash making their own engine and constantly struggling with compatibility when they can just grab a free engine that someone else is kind enough to make for them?

What if they could put all those resources they are wasting on constantly dealing with compatibility and staying up to date with the engine, and instead put everyone on making UI and services?

Presto might be fast and portable, but everyone is moving to phones that have multi-core CPUs and run at 1GHz or more. And everything except Android and iOS are basically irrelevant at this point, so who cares about portable?

Reply Parent Score: 1

Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

Why would you leave your 20 year investment in your own technology behind and switch to something that will provide no competitive angles to the competition?

It is *not* free to switch, you will have to relearn the technology and reprogram all that you have invented previously, like Opera Mail, Unite.

I still don't see it. Unless they are only switching the rendering engine? Still a lot of work, still a lot of reprogramming...

Reply Parent Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

everything except Android and iOS are basically irrelevant at this point, so who cares about portable?

That's probably not really true yet. Things might appear so if you're in one of the most visible, affluent markets.

However, since we're on the topic of Opera, and when talking not about sales but what people actually use...

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_vendor-ww-monthly-201003-201301 - still plenty of browsing from Nokia devices, none of them "Android and iOS", Opera capable of running on most of them ( http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-ww-monthly-201003-201301 & http://www.opera.com/smw/2011/11/ - mostly S40 "feature phones")

Reply Parent Score: 2

ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Don't understand this at all. The home made browser engine is fast and portable. Why put effort into a me-too browser when the rest of the competition has deeper pockets to diversify on webkit?

It does not make any sense, effort should have been put into compelling features, not yet-another-webkit browser.

Totally baffled...


It encourages people to unknowingly code for quirks of HOW WebKit implements a standard.

I believe there were some IE6-era Javascript things that would never have worked in V8 because, while they worked in IE6, they weren't part of the standard and were incompatible with V8's approach to JITing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

The older IEs use something called JScript, which isn't JavaScript.

Reply Parent Score: 2