Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 19th Jan 2013 14:22 UTC
Opera Software This is actually pretty big news - both exciting and tragic at the same time. Opera has revealed Opera Ice, its next mobile browser, to PocketLint. This new browser represent a big shift in both user interface as well as rendering engine, since it has a new, unique interface, as well as a new rendering engine... New to Opera, that is, as it's a WebKit-browser.
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PresentIt
Member since:
2010-02-10

Don't understand this at all. The home made browser engine is fast and portable. Why put effort into a me-too browser when the rest of the competition has deeper pockets to diversify on webkit?

Exactly. The competition has deeper pockets, so why should Opera spend tons of cash making their own engine and constantly struggling with compatibility when they can just grab a free engine that someone else is kind enough to make for them?

What if they could put all those resources they are wasting on constantly dealing with compatibility and staying up to date with the engine, and instead put everyone on making UI and services?

Presto might be fast and portable, but everyone is moving to phones that have multi-core CPUs and run at 1GHz or more. And everything except Android and iOS are basically irrelevant at this point, so who cares about portable?

Reply Parent Score: 1

Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

Why would you leave your 20 year investment in your own technology behind and switch to something that will provide no competitive angles to the competition?

It is *not* free to switch, you will have to relearn the technology and reprogram all that you have invented previously, like Opera Mail, Unite.

I still don't see it. Unless they are only switching the rendering engine? Still a lot of work, still a lot of reprogramming...

Reply Parent Score: 3

MrWeeble Member since:
2007-04-18

Why would you leave your 20 year investment in your own technology behind and switch to something that will provide no competitive angles to the competition?


Perhaps they took some advice from Nokia?

Reply Parent Score: 7

someone Member since:
2006-01-12

This is actually not such a big switch from a technical perspective. Opera uses Qt as its toolkit, and Qt had already adopted WebKit as its standard rendering engine a long time ago. So essentially, they are just switching from a custom rendering engine to the standard rendering engine of the platform. In addition, Opera always has the option to integrate their Carakan Javascript engine, if they are unsatisfied with the performance of JavaScriptCore or wanted something to differentiate themselves from the rest of the WebKit crowd

Edited 2013-01-19 17:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

PresentIt Member since:
2010-02-10

Why would you leave your 20 year investment in your own technology behind and switch to something that will provide no competitive angles to the competition?


Because your 20 year investment is bogging you down and leaving you well behind the competition?

Because switching to the technology the competition is making for you for free suddenly gives you loads of spare resources that can be used for actual innovations instead of constantly trying to catch up?

Using the same engine as another browser doesn't mean you have no competitive angle. That depends entirely on what you build on top of the engine.

It is *not* free to switch, you will have to relearn the technology and reprogram all that you have invented previously, like Opera Mail, Unite.

Unite is being dropped.

And while it's not free to switch, the resources used to build something on WebKit would otherwise be wasting their time constantly fixing compatibility problems. And once the port has been done you suddenly have tons of spare resources that used to be dedicated to building a separate engine. This makes sense if you think ahead a few years.

I still don't see it. Unless they are only switching the rendering engine? Still a lot of work, still a lot of reprogramming...

Sure, it's just a rumor based on basically nothing. But it would not be a stupid thing to do. The reprogramming would be done by people who would otherwise be working on the current engine.

Reply Parent Score: 1

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

everything except Android and iOS are basically irrelevant at this point, so who cares about portable?

That's probably not really true yet. Things might appear so if you're in one of the most visible, affluent markets.

However, since we're on the topic of Opera, and when talking not about sales but what people actually use...

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_vendor-ww-monthly-201003-201301 - still plenty of browsing from Nokia devices, none of them "Android and iOS", Opera capable of running on most of them ( http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-ww-monthly-201003-201301 & http://www.opera.com/smw/2011/11/ - mostly S40 "feature phones")

Reply Parent Score: 2

PresentIt Member since:
2010-02-10

Mobile vendors? This is about browsing the web on your phone. Did you look at the stats lately (flawed as they are)?

Opera Mini can run on all those Java devices. But for full browsers there's basically just two targets.

Reply Parent Score: 2