Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 11:37 UTC
Legal Back in 2010, Apple, Google, Intel, Adobe, and a few others settled with the US Department of Justice regarding their anti-poaching agreements concerning employees. While the CEOs did a good job of escaping possible prosecution, the affected employees filed a class action lawsuit about this, and judge Lucy Koh has just unsealed a number of emails concerning this case. They paint a pretty grim picture of Steve Jobs and Eric Schmidt engaging in mafia practices, threatening smaller companies with patent litigation if they didn't agree to the no-poaching agreements, or demanding to handle matters verbally as to not leave a paper trail.
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RE[5]: No, only Jobs
by MOS6510 on Thu 24th Jan 2013 12:15 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: No, only Jobs"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Apparently, according to researchers, people who cheat in school and at exams are more successful in life than those who don't.

Cheaters bend the rules or break them to achieve goals.

So in a way you and Dark Helmet are right.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: No, only Jobs
by Alfman on Thu 24th Jan 2013 15:44 in reply to "RE[5]: No, only Jobs"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

MOS6510,

"Apparently, according to researchers, people who cheat in school and at exams are more successful in life than those who don't."


That would be a very interesting read, can you provide a link?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: No, only Jobs
by MOS6510 on Thu 24th Jan 2013 17:00 in reply to "RE[6]: No, only Jobs"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

A quick search didn't find anything. It may have been a podcast, but I'll do some mors searching later or tomorrow on a bigger screen.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: No, only Jobs
by MOS6510 on Fri 25th Jan 2013 07:52 in reply to "RE[6]: No, only Jobs"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Sadly I can't find it, but you have to trust me on this.

The gist of it was that people who cheat in school or are more likely to break rules to get to their goals tend to be more successful (not necessarily happier) in live.

Microsoft is a nice example (even though it's not a person, but run by persons). They did some nasty things, got punished a few times, but in the end they are a multi billion company. If they played it fair and moral they'd probably be a computer shop in Seattle selling no-brand PCs.

Steve, Bill, Mark, they all did "unfair" things, all got their fingers burned or have been frowned upon, but they're at the top (well, one is at the bottom, but he was right up there). Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Amazon, they all cross the line sometimes, but the rewards are higher than the fines or settlements.

Us fair people don't think that's fair, but being nice and fair doesn't get you that far in this world. Now I don't want to turn to the Dark Side, but I do think it's good to realize that this is just how it is. We can be surprised and upset each time a story comes out, but there is a lot more and everybody is doing it. From beggars to presidents, from family homes to governments. Even the church does it!

Also kind of related it has shown that doing well in school depends more on motivation than I.Q. So if you wondered why some seemingly dumb people do have a higher degree than you, now you know.

Reply Parent Score: 2