Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 4th Feb 2013 12:10 UTC
Multimedia, AV "Sony has announced it is to deliver its last MiniDisc stereo next month. It marks an end to the firm's support for the system which it launched in 1992. The format only ever had limited success outside of Japan and was ultimately doomed by the rise of recordable CDs and MP3 players." My format of choice for personal audio up until a few years ago, when the rest of the world had already long moved on to MP3. Nothing beats the satisfying sound of closing a portable MiniDisc player/recorder with a disc in it.
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RE[2]: sony...
by smashIt on Mon 4th Feb 2013 14:35 UTC in reply to "RE: sony..."
smashIt
Member since:
2005-07-06

and is quite successful.


yes, it's not as spectacular a failure as the other formats, but successful is something different

just to break down the numbers:
-BR is 7 years old, and for 5 years it's the only HD disc-format
-it has better image- and sound-quality than the dvd
-it's more expensive to produce (both content and manufacturing-wise)
-and even though they are sold at the same price-level as DVDs, they only account for 20-25% of all sales

that's a failure all around

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: sony...
by ssokolow on Mon 4th Feb 2013 16:10 in reply to "RE[2]: sony..."
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

yes, it's not as spectacular a failure as the other formats, but successful is something different

just to break down the numbers:
-BR is 7 years old, and for 5 years it's the only HD disc-format
-it has better image- and sound-quality than the dvd
-it's more expensive to produce (both content and manufacturing-wise)
-and even though they are sold at the same price-level as DVDs, they only account for 20-25% of all sales

that's a failure all around


Depends. Do you just mean as a movie format? ...because, among other reasons, I don't trust them to rip to WebM on the first try using only open-source software. With DVDs, that's not a problem.

Also, my brothers are the only people in the house with computer new enough to come with BluRay drives (which they don't use for BluRay either). You can even find DVD-ROM drives in the dumpster these days.

However, for non-movie use, I'll probably pick up a BluRay burner as soon as my current DVD+R drive wears out. BluRay media does seem to have stablized at around 50% of the per-gigabyte cost of DVD+Rs.

(I just need to spend some time googling on what the most reliable brands are)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: sony...
by wonea on Mon 4th Feb 2013 16:46 in reply to "RE[2]: sony..."
wonea Member since:
2005-10-28

Bluray might not be as successful as DVD, but it's possibly your last chance to actually own a movie, and streaming doesn't count.

So let us enjoy the format, happy in the fact we don't have to pay a monthly streaming contract so we can watch our preferred movies.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: sony...
by smashIt on Mon 4th Feb 2013 17:09 in reply to "RE[3]: sony..."
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

but it's possibly your last chance to actually own a movie


thats one of the reasons why I buy blurays ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: sony...
by darknexus on Wed 6th Feb 2013 03:54 in reply to "RE[3]: sony..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Bluray might not be as successful as DVD, but it's possibly your last chance to actually own a movie, and streaming doesn't count.

Ah, if only that were true. Have you checked into Blu-Ray's drm capabilities lately? They can lock you out of your own physical media, unless you rip the disk to an alternate format first. And of course, in certain countries, doing this is illegal even though the studios locking you out of your own purchases is not.

So let us enjoy the format, happy in the fact we don't have to pay a monthly streaming contract so we can watch our preferred movies.

Are you kidding? Do you know how many people pay extortion prices for cable TV (we're talking $70-$90 USD per month in the US)? Do you think those people are going to even raise an eyebrow over a streaming cost? People don't think and, if streaming is cheaper than Blu-Ray (which, in the US at least, it most definitely is with Netflix and other services like it) then they'll go for that. Why buy one Blu-Ray movie for $20-$30 USD when you can pay $8/month and watch as many movies as you want? I don't agree with it personally, but if you look at the market, that's where we're going and, much as I don't like the idea that everything's streamed, I like the idea that I can be locked out of my own physical disks even less.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: sony...
by ilovebeer on Mon 4th Feb 2013 17:34 in reply to "RE[2]: sony..."
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

-it's more expensive to produce (both content and manufacturing-wise)

Neither of these claims is true. I take it you didn't actually do any research before posting them.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: sony...
by smashIt on Mon 4th Feb 2013 17:58 in reply to "RE[3]: sony..."
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

Neither of these claims is true. I take it you didn't actually do any research before posting them.


thats funny
i thought that with a dvd <40c and a BR ~1€ the BR could savely be called more expensive
but my math could be off ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: sony...
by Chrispynutt on Mon 4th Feb 2013 17:45 in reply to "RE[2]: sony..."
Chrispynutt Member since:
2012-03-14

Hmm, they sell blu ray players and discs in my local super market. And this is not a city store by any means.

I think there is a lot more range than just binary fail and success.

MD was successful in some markets, not all. Beta lived on as a production format. Blu Ray is allegedly the format the new consoles from Microsoft and Sony will use.

So yeah DVD and CD were far bigger success. Complete barn stormers. But we are not talking about HD-DVD, digital tape, Video 2000 style failures either.

What I would agree with is that Sony's strangle hold on a format directly affects the success for the format. However a good format is still a good format for all that.

However niche success is quite different from complete flop.

Reply Parent Score: 2