Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 10th Feb 2013 22:18 UTC, submitted by Nth_Man
Hardware, Embedded Systems " bricked a Samsung laptop today. Unlike most of the reported cases of Samsung laptops refusing to boot, I never booted Linux on it - all experimentation was performed under Windows. It seems that the bug we've been seeing is simultaneously simpler in some ways and more complicated in others than we'd previously realised." On a related note, the Linux Foundation's UEFI secure boot system has been released.
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UEFI malware uses
by Nth_Man on Mon 11th Feb 2013 08:52 UTC
Nth_Man
Member since:
2010-05-16

That Samsung UEFI problem also brings possibilities for malware people. "Pay or get bricked" or "do this or get bricked" or "my computer is bricked" sounds really bad. If someone has a Samsung computer with UEFI, he'd better think about returning it.

Reply Score: 3

RE: UEFI malware uses
by Gone fishing on Mon 11th Feb 2013 18:58 in reply to "UEFI malware uses"
Gone fishing Member since:
2006-02-22

Doesn't secure boot do this by design? For average users one of the worst thing they perceive can happen, is their box wont boot. Secure boot means that if there is a change in the booting system, kernel etc then the box wont boot.

Am I alone in thinking this leaves lots of opportunities for ransom maleware and general bad behaviour? Is the solution worse tan the problem?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: UEFI malware uses
by Nth_Man on Mon 11th Feb 2013 20:38 in reply to "RE: UEFI malware uses"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

Am I alone in thinking this leaves lots of opportunities for ransom malware and general bad behaviour?

No, you're not alone. "Bricking" a Samsung UEFI computer is very, very harmful and "secure boot"+UEFI can also cause harmful "not booting" problems even without the Samsung UEFI bug.

Is the solution worse tan the problem?

I think so, too.

Reply Parent Score: 3