Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 9th Feb 2013 18:54 UTC
Windows "The 16-bit Windows kernel was actually three kernels. One if you were using an 8086 processor, another if you were using an 80286 processor, and a third if you were using an 80386 processor. The 8086 kernel was a completely separate beast, but the 80286 and 80386 kernels shared a lot of code in common." As always, Raymond Chen delivers. If you don't yet follow his blog, you should. Right now. Click that bookmark or RSS button.
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RE: On a side note
by sparkyERTW on Mon 11th Feb 2013 14:01 UTC in reply to "On a side note"
sparkyERTW
Member since:
2010-06-09

It looks like there are different cultures at Microsoft. While the business side is definitely not my favorite, there are still some technical guys who care.


Same here. While I tend to take issue with a lot of the company's actions, it's often pretty clear that the developers themselves - for the most part - are commendable. They're not the ones who sue other companies, they're not the ones who make the decision not to play nice with others, and they're not the ones who spread FUD (again, for the most part). They just tend to be a bunch of people wanting to do some really cool stuff with the mighty resources M$ has, and who hope that what they create manages to slip through the management/marketing/legal divisions unscathed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: On a side note
by siride on Mon 11th Feb 2013 14:10 in reply to "RE: On a side note"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

And all the backwards compatibility stuff that people complain about...that takes a huge amount of work. The fact that Windows can completely change its kernel and graphical implementation without breaking most programs written 20+ years ago is nothing short of an engineering miracle.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: On a side note
by Alfman on Tue 12th Feb 2013 02:08 in reply to "RE[2]: On a side note"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

siride,

"The fact that Windows can completely change its kernel and graphical implementation without breaking most programs written 20+ years ago is nothing short of an engineering miracle."

I mostly agree, but it hasn't been completely smooth. Some of the stuff I wrote in VB in the 90s stopped working. Of course the only reason I found out was because I was poking around my early career archive for fun. Someone would need to test a large sample of software from that era to assess how well compatibility has held up in general.

Another article that was along these lines:

http://www.osnews.com/story/26623/Why_was_Pinball_removed_from_Wind...

Reply Parent Score: 2