Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Feb 2013 10:40 UTC
General Development "Since I left my job at Amazon I have spent a lot of time reading great source code. Having exhausted the insanely good idSoftware pool, the next thing to read was one of the greatest game of all time: Duke Nukem 3D and the engine powering it named 'Build'. It turned out to be a difficult experience: The engine delivered great value and ranked high in terms of speed, stability and memory consumption but my enthousiasm met a source code controversial in terms of organization, best practices and comments/documentation. This reading session taught me a lot about code legacy and what helps a software live long." Hail to the king, baby.
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RE[2]: Code Review
by bassbeast on Sat 16th Feb 2013 00:52 UTC in reply to "RE: Code Review"
bassbeast
Member since:
2007-11-11

To me the measure of whether code is "good" or "bad" is really VERY simple: Does it do the job as intended? Does it waste resources or use them well? is it stable?

And I would have to say no matter how "pretty" the code is Ken Silverman's Build engine, which not only powered Duke but 2 of my fav games of all time, Redneck rampage (who couldn't love a game where you shoot a titty gun and fling dynamite while drinking beer and eating moonpies while listening to Mojo Nixon?) and BLOOD, which riffs all the cheesy horror tropes of the 80s (you even start in the Phantasm funeral home) while giving in both insanely huge levels with tons of secrets

I'm sure everybody has seen that diagram showing the diff between today's shooters and the games then, how then it was huge expanses filled with secrets while today you are led by the nose from one set piece to the next in a straight line? Well anybody who likes the former should BUY NOW Redneck, duke 3D and Blood, they can be had from GOG quite cheaply and just for joining you can get something like 6 games for free just as a thank you for trying them out which includes warsow and Ultima 4.

These games are still a blast, I still fire up all 3 and have a blast, and since its GOG and DOSBox you can run it on Linux and Mac and anyplace else DOSBox will run so go and get 'em and have a ball!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Code Review
by zima on Fri 22nd Feb 2013 19:16 in reply to "RE[2]: Code Review"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm sure everybody has seen that diagram showing the diff between today's shooters and the games then, how then it was huge expanses filled with secrets while today you are led by the nose from one set piece to the next in a straight line?

I think reasons for that are varied... might be also technical, the old-style engine necessitating more "compacted" (more ~square) maps. Or it reflects what players mostly want, just to kill monsters and bad guys; also more varied scenery (instead of going back and forth on one map all the time - more quickly boring scenery in a way).

But I remember reviews from 2 decades ago - mostly filled with walkthroughs, and... lists of secrets (even worse with adventure game walkhroughs). That wasn't the best way to game.

Overall it's what... we wanted back then, the general public acceptance of our games, for them to have mainstream appeal. And/or you're getting old - old times are always better ;)

GOG [...] just for joining you can get something like 6 games for free just as a thank you for trying them out which includes warsow and Ultima 4.

Warsow was always a free game BTW.

Reply Parent Score: 2