Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th Feb 2013 09:04 UTC
Apple John Gruber illustrates the dangers of not having a clue about history: "The utter simplicity of the iOS home screen is Apple's innovation. It's the simplest, most obvious 'system' ever designed." Thanks for playing.
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RE[6]: To be fair
by JAlexoid on Wed 20th Feb 2013 13:12 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: To be fair"
JAlexoid
Member since:
2009-05-19

because they don't look like bubbles


Really!?!?!?!

Bubble:
http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs46/f/2009/232/9/8/Blue_Bubble_by_hallv...

Balloon:
http://www.csballoon.com/img/purplemet_balloon.jpg

iOS icons with "those" - do they look like ballons or bubbles?
http://i.stack.imgur.com/EQsS5.jpg


I see no contradiction.

Well... Maybe can and can't mean the same in your head.

Reading your other comments attached to this story it seems you get confused by the calendar app showing the current date while the weather app launches the weather app.

The operation of both contradict your claim of simplicity. Both show a number. Both numbers mean the content of the app, not part of the logo. One number does not change the other does. You get used to it(like I did), but people get used to SAP Legacy Workbench as well.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: To be fair
by henderson101 on Wed 20th Feb 2013 13:19 in reply to "RE[6]: To be fair"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

No, they aren't "bubbles", nor are they called "bubbles" by Apple in English. They are called "badges" by Apple and any Apple developer worth half their salt.

The concept isn't even hard to understand - "you have X amount of items that you have yet to look at". So for Mail, that is emails. For Calendar that is new appointments. For Messages that is sms/imessage. For other apps, it depends on what the developer is trying to convey - but generally it's going to be "items I have synced for you in some way shape or form."

Edited 2013-02-20 13:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[8]: To be fair
by JAlexoid on Wed 20th Feb 2013 13:27 in reply to "RE[7]: To be fair"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Why the f***k would I care what Apple calls them? They look like bubbles more than they look like anything else.
There is also the idiom "to bubble up", that works better than badges in the context of notifications.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: To be fair
by MOS6510 on Wed 20th Feb 2013 13:20 in reply to "RE[6]: To be fair"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

I think the problem is that you have no iOS experience. Those "bubbled" numbers are called (notification) badges, the informational messages that appear at the top of the screen are called notifications and can also be found in the notification center. IIRC it's the same with Android. Well, Android borrowed the badges, iOS borrowed the notifications.

Personally I don't think these feature should cause any confusing, certainly not on the long term and users prefer to have them.

Neither the badges or the notifications change the icon grid in such a way that people are not able to launch their favorite apps.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: To be fair
by JAlexoid on Wed 20th Feb 2013 13:45 in reply to "RE[7]: To be fair"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Those "bubbled" numbers are called

Yes, by Apple. They also call your network operator a carrier, even if you selected British English.

Well, Android borrowed the badges, iOS borrowed the notifications.

Android has no badges. Unless it's another skin. iOS borrowed the notification drawer only(and they shouldn't have stopped there)

I think the problem is that you have no iOS experience.

Yeah... right.

Personally I don't think these feature should cause any confusing, certainly not on the long term and users prefer to have them.

And I said they were confusing? They are not complex, per se. They are misplaced. If you have your to-do app on another page, you'll have to move around between the screens to see if that app needs your attention. I don't know about you, but I have a lot of apps I use regularly that don't fit on my first page. Swiping to check if I have to open them is not simplicity of operation.

Everything complex is made up of simple things.

Reply Parent Score: 3