Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 6th Mar 2013 11:54 UTC
Legal "The European Commission has imposed a EUR 561 million fine on Microsoft for failing to comply with its commitments to offer users a browser choice screen enabling them to easily choose their preferred web browser. In 2009, the Commission had made these commitments legally binding on Microsoft until 2014. In today's decision, the Commission finds that Microsoft failed to roll out the browser choice screen with its Windows 7 Service Pack 1 from May 2011 until July 2012. 15 million Windows users in the EU therefore did not see the choice screen during this period. Microsoft has acknowledged that the choice screen was not displayed during that time." Burn.
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RE[8]: Comment by ilovebeer
by Alfman on Fri 8th Mar 2013 00:58 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by ilovebeer"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

WorknMan,

I agree with most of that regarding DMCA.

We're not going to see eye to eye on having no government regulation at all though. Just because some laws are bad doesn't mean we should get rid of all of them - especially those like antitrust (do correct me if I'm mistaken, but that sounded like the logic you used to reject anti-trust law).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by ilovebeer
by WorknMan on Fri 8th Mar 2013 01:26 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by ilovebeer"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

We're not going to see eye to eye on having no government regulation at all though. Just because some laws are bad doesn't mean we should get rid of all of them - especially those like antitrust (do correct me if I'm mistaken, but that sounded like the logic you used to reject anti-trust law).


Well, of course I'm not an anarchist, so you and I would agree that some amount of government regulation is necessary. What we will disagree on is what is considered 'necessary' ;) I remember when EA bought exclusive rights to make NFL games (which put all Madden competitors out of commission), and of course some people were screaming 'LAWSUIT!'

Clearly, we have to draw the line somewhere, as a lot of this shit just gets superfluous. Personally, when it comes to companies being douchebags, I don't think 'it's going to suck if the government doesn't do something' is a good enough reason to get government involved. To me, anytime you ask for government interference is pretty serious, and should be reserved for dire situations. Why? As I said, the law of unintended consequences.

On a broader level though, I do believe government should be revamped. Instead of congressmen, what we really ought to have is a panel of experts in each field, that are elected by a majority, who probably have a vested interest in that particular field. For example, you probably wouldn't see many hardcore techies voting on matters of agreculture, and you wouldn't have people rejecting, for example, a candidate who might be an expert on economics, just because they don't like his/her stance on gay marriage. There wouldn't need to be 'hot button' issues anymore. Could you imagine when SOPA was brought up and we had a panel of technology gurus running that show, instead of a bunch of 60-something year-old geezers who probably couldn't manage to turn on a f**king iPod? It would've been laughed out of existence.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Comment by ilovebeer
by Alfman on Fri 8th Mar 2013 14:00 in reply to "RE[9]: Comment by ilovebeer"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

WorknMan,

"Personally, when it comes to companies being douchebags, I don't think 'it's going to suck if the government doesn't do something' is a good enough reason to get government involved. To me, anytime you ask for government interference is pretty serious, and should be reserved for dire situations. Why? As I said, the law of unintended consequences."

Well that's reasonable, I just think when one company is abusing it's position to block competitors, that is a dire situation. Not end-of-life dire, but the end-of-the-open-market dire. I find it ironic, yet true that unregulated corporations can choke the free market as much as government regulation.


"For example, you probably wouldn't see many hardcore techies voting on matters of agreculture, and you wouldn't have people rejecting, for example, a candidate who might be an expert on economics, just because they don't like his/her stance on gay marriage."

This is altogether a different matter, but absolutely. Voting granularity is a big problem resulting in idiotic compromises between completely unrelated issues.

Edited 2013-03-08 14:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2