Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Mar 2013 23:07 UTC
Windows "A senior Samsung Electronics executive said Friday the launch of Windows 8 has failed to bolster demand for PCs and he does not expect the PC industry to rebound soon." Of course, Samsung and other OEMs could've, you know, built better computers. Just a suggestion.
Thread beginning with comment 554787
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
cmost
Member since:
2006-07-16

As someone who recently had the displeasure of configuring a newly purchased Windows 8 computer for a family member who could be described as less than tech savvy I have to wonder what Microsoft was thinking with Windows 8. The computer in question was a standard desktop tower. I had to do a Google search to figure out how to log in. It turns out one has to maneuver the mouse to "flick up" the lower half of the Welcome screen to reveal the login prompt. Once logged in, I discovered numerous non-intuitive designs, including elusive hot corners and border-less Metro apps that are not intuitively exited without knowing about the aforementioned hot corners. I can only imagine all of this will make life hell for users accustomed to previous Windows editions. While all this might be lovely on a touch-screen tablet or laptop device, it's entirely inappropriate and even confusing for those using Windows 8 on a traditional desktop. Thankfully I found Classic Shell, a free tool that installed easily and allowed me to bypass many of Windows 8's most annoying aspects to recreate a computing experience more akin to previous editions of Windows that most Windows users know and love. How long something like this will work only Microsoft knows...

Edited 2013-03-08 23:19 UTC

Reply Score: 13

BeamishBoy Member since:
2010-10-27

I've been running Windows 8 for a few weeks now. A few observations on what you've said:

I had to do a Google search to figure out how to log in. It turns out one has to maneuver the mouse to "flick up" the lower half of the Welcome screen to reveal the login prompt.


I don't know why this is happening. All I have to do is press a key or click the mouse to bring up the login prompt.

Once logged in, I discovered numerous non-intuitive designs, including elusive hot corners and border-less Metro apps that are not intuitively exited without knowing about the aforementioned hot corners. I can only imagine all of this will make life hell for users accustomed to previous Windows editions.


You can get out of a Metro application in two main ways: either kill the application using Alt-F4 or switch to another application using Alt-Tab or Win-Tab. Additionally, many Metro apps give you the ability to close them by right-clicking to bring up settings.

When you think about it, this really isn't that different from previous versions of windows.

While all this might be lovely on a touch-screen tablet or laptop device, it's entirely inappropriate and even confusing for those using Windows 8 on a traditional desktop.


Going on all the negative press that I'd read about it prior to using it, I would have believed this. But having used it for a few weeks now, I actually prefer how Windows 8 does things. Give it some time.

Reply Parent Score: 4

gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

You can get out of a Metro application in two main ways: either kill the application using Alt-F4 or switch to another application using Alt-Tab or Win-Tab. Additionally, many Metro apps give you the ability to close them by right-clicking to bring up settings.


I have no experience with Win8 so I can't comment on it's UI, but there's something I'm curious about here. Has anyone ever done any sort of research/study on how many people actually use Alt-F4 or Alt/Super-Tab?

I'm sure the average teen or MS-Office user knows these bindings, but my mum never knew about it in all her time with Win 98 and XP. Also experienced my fair share of "how-u-do-dat?!!" reactions from people while I Alt-Tabbed to switch between apps whenever helping them out on their computers, and they came from all walks of life.

Right-clicking is probably more natural for someone raised on Windows, I figure.

Edited 2013-03-09 10:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

The charms bar needed to be called "the secret bar that pops out of the side of the screen that you don't really expect".

Reply Parent Score: 2

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I had to do a Google search to figure out how to log in. It turns out one has to maneuver the mouse to "flick up" the lower half of the Welcome screen to reveal the login prompt.


Hm. I just pressed space button.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Same. To be fair to the OP though -- this shouldn't be the case.

I've also seen people who stare at the lock screen blankly and ask me how to get the thing to go to the login prompt.

If everyone used Windows Phone this wouldn't be an issue ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3