Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Mar 2013 16:13 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Mark Shuttleworth: "I simply have zero interest in the crowd who wants to be different. Leet. 'Linux is supposed to be hard so it's exclusive' is just the dumbest thing that a smart person could say." He's right. Lots of interesting insights in this blog post - I may not agree with everything Ubuntu does, but at least it's doing something.
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RE[3]: Comment by Laurence
by lucas_maximus on Sat 9th Mar 2013 09:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Laurence"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

The problem with desktop Linux is due to

* Fragmentation.
* Backwards Compatibility (I mean for large programs released 10 years ago, not "I can compile the version of screen from 15 years ago".
* Drivers (and don't give me the speil about how it has more drivers than Windows, most of the drivers that aren't actively worked on are of poor quality).
* Lack of single vision.

While the situation is better than when I said fuck it and went back to Windows in 2006.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Laurence
by Alfman on Sat 9th Mar 2013 15:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Laurence"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"The problem with desktop Linux is due to
* Fragmentation."

True, but on the other hand I'd honestly rather have more choices than a become dependent upon a single commercial entitee who's idea of a successful OS is vendor lock. At least with linux and open source in general one has a very practical hedge against monopolisation. That more than makes up for fragmentation in my opinion, but opinions will vary.

"* Backwards Compatibility (I mean for large programs released 10 years ago, not 'I can compile the version of screen from 15 years ago'."

Linux lacks kernel stability, which sucks, but I've found linux userspace application interfaces to be amazingly stable, do you have a real example we can try or are you just being hypothetical?


"* Drivers (and don't give me the speil about how it has more drivers than Windows, most of the drivers that aren't actively worked on are of poor quality)."

That's partly fair. But consider that the difference is that the hardware you've bought was manufacturer certified to run on your version of windows, while you probably failed to buy hardware certified for linux (right?). Still, as an engineer you should be *astonished* that you can even do this with linux and have a good chance that it will just work out of the box.

Edited 2013-03-09 15:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by Laurence
by lucas_maximus on Sat 9th Mar 2013 19:35 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Laurence"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

True, but on the other hand I'd honestly rather have more choices than a become dependent upon a single commercial entitee who's idea of a successful OS is vendor lock.


You guys don't know what lock-in really means. Lock-in is where you are dependent on a third party for supporting a bespoke application where all you data is tied up in and the company charges you £10000 for a bug fix which you know is only a few lines of code.

Sorry Windows is hardly lock-in compared to what I have experienced being on the other end.

At least with linux and open source in general one has a very practical hedge against monopolisation. That more than makes up for fragmentation in my opinion, but opinions will vary


It maybe, but fragmentation causes problems with software and hardware support. Microsoft try really hard with a few exceptions to keep things backwardly compatible.

Linux lacks kernel stability, which sucks, but I've found linux userspace application interfaces to be amazingly stable, do you have a real example we can try or are you just being hypothetical?


If it isn't open-source and doesn't bundle all the required libraries I suspect you would have problems getting an old program running because you tend to get into dependency hell.

You can symlink libraries etc, but you are relying on it having the same API as last time.

That's partly fair. But consider that the difference is that the hardware you've bought was manufacturer certified to run on your version of windows, while you probably failed to buy hardware certified for linux (right?). Still, as an engineer you should be *astonished* that you can even do this with linux and have a good chance that it will just work out of the box.


I understand the reasons why, which is fair enough. But I don't really care why when I am end user. I just got other shit to get on with. That is why I buy software that either provides the support or can easily emulate what i need to do.

It swings and roundabout. I use Linux quite a lot at home but I've seen people stuggle when things go wrong with any computing platform.

Android and Chrome OS will become the mainstream Linux on general purpose devices.

Edited 2013-03-09 19:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Sun 10th Mar 2013 12:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Laurence"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

The problem with desktop Linux is due to

* Fragmentation.
* Backwards Compatibility (I mean for large programs released 10 years ago, not "I can compile the version of screen from 15 years ago".

You're just reiterating my point though.
Canonical are creating more unessential fragmentation and further breaking compatibility.


* Drivers (and don't give me the speil about how it has more drivers than Windows, most of the drivers that aren't actively worked on are of poor quality).

That's bullshit. But I expect no less from a windows fanboy.


* Lack of single vision.

Repetition. You already said fragmentation.


While the situation is better than when I said fuck it and went back to Windows in 2006.

So you've not used Linux in nearly a decade yet feel fully qualified to start a flame war. Nice one troll. But how about you actually comment on the topic (Shuttleworth and his vision of Linux) instead of constantly regurgitating your same half backed OS bigotry than you spew out whenever any topic other than Windows crops up.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Laurence
by Slambert666 on Mon 11th Mar 2013 03:50 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Laurence"
Slambert666 Member since:
2008-10-30

Lawrence... Your opinions are the cancer that is killing desktop linux.
You do not understand this because you are only 12 years old, but if the linux community does not eject harmful people like you there is no future for desktop linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2