Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 9th Mar 2013 15:42 UTC
Games "For nearly thirty years we've been having this discussion, asking the question: do violent movies, music or video games make people violent? Well according to Brad Bushman and Craig Anderson of Iowa State University, yes. Based on the results of their research they concluded in 2001 that video games and violent media can make people aggressive and violent. Based upon their data and their conclusions, however, it's safe to say that photos of snakes, crispy bacon, or a particularly rigorous game of chess can also make people aggressive and violent." And politicians?
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WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

I think a lot of people are under the impression that, "Well, I play a lot of violent video games and I'm not out shooting people, so they must be completely harmless, right?" IMO, that is a much too simplistic point of view. I'm not sure how people think they can play these kinds of games for hours on end where you're shooting up and/or murdering other players/computer opponents, and it not have SOME sort of effect on you, even if those effects are too subtle to notice.


Everything we do, see or hear in our lives does have an effect on us, but you're assuming that consuming violent games has a negative effect on us. The thing is, people react to things differently: some people get aggressive when playing violent games, some people actually relax and get less aggressive, and then there are the unstable ones that may act in one or another completely random way.

On a similar note, you're assuming that seeing violence desensitivizes you and makes you not care about other people getting hurt, but that's again a terribly one-sided assumption. I, for example, understand violence and its effects BETTER the more I see it -- not the opposite -- and am even less likely to commit some violent act.

As for the school-shootings and similar situations where the person committing the act was a gamer? Well, you may not have noticed that in almost all of the cases it was a person who was mentally ill, but wasn't receiving (enough) treatment. The thing about unstable, mentally ill people is that the trigger that makes them go over the board could literally be anything, it just has to happen at an opportune time. The way to fix that would be treating the people, not blaming everything that happens to act as the trigger.

Reply Parent Score: 3

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Everything we do, see or hear in our lives does have an effect on us, but you're assuming that consuming violent games has a negative effect on us. The thing is, people react to things differently: some people get aggressive when playing violent games, some people actually relax and get less aggressive, and then there are the unstable ones that may act in one or another completely random way.

On a similar note, you're assuming that seeing violence desensitivizes you and makes you not care about other people getting hurt


I think you assume too much about what I assume ;) I do agree with your first sentence though... everything we do, see, or hear has an effect on us. And I think we can conclude that those effects are either positive or negative. I will readily admit that I do not understand all of the ramifications involved; I'm just not sure what sort of positive effect can come out of engaging in hours of simulated murder. Again, I think it's rather naive for people to believe that, because we don't all turn into violent mass murderers as a result of playing these games, then the effects of playing them must obviously be positive.

If I haven't made my point abundantly clear yet, I am not making ANY sort of claim about what SPECIFIC effects these games have on people, only that the total overall effect is either positive or negative. And if it isn't positive, people need to understand that it is hurting them in SOME way. That doesn't necessarily mean we have to avoid them altogether; just treat them like eating a doughnut - something to be enjoyed in moderation, but realizing that overall, it's bad for us.

Edited 2013-03-10 22:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

On a similar note, you're assuming that seeing violence desensitivizes you


Well, of course it does but that is balanced by the fact that few people do nothing else but watch ultra-violence all day.

Does violent games make you violent? Under the right circumstance, sure, but no one lives under those conditions and they could very rarely exist outside a controlled experiment.

This is of course not limited to games and movies. Keep someone isolated and feed them nothing but gruesome and desensitizing literature for years on end and you'll have the same result, especially if you start at an early age.

Reply Parent Score: 2