Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Mar 2013 14:51 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless After a few months of planning, several weeks of work, and possibly a few kilometres of aimless pacing through the living room, I'm happy to present "Palm: I'm ready to wallow now". This massive article (22,000 words) covers countless aspects of Palm, its devices, its operating system, and the company's importance to the mobile industry. I start with a detailed look at the history of handwriting recognition, after which I move on to the four hardware products I believe are crucial in understanding Palm as a company. Of course, I also dive into Palm OS, covering the kernel, its filesystem (or lack thereof), 'multitasking' capabilities, user experience, and much more. Important Palm OS licensees like Sony and Handspring make an appearance, and I cover the failed attempt at modernising the Palm OS: Palm OS 6 Cobalt. Finally, the conclusion ties it all together. For the first time in OSNews' history, you can also buy this article to support OSNews and make more articles like this possible in the future (don't worry - the regular online version is free, as always!). I suggest you grab a coffee, sit back, and enjoy.
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RE[3]: PDF version
by Wondercool on Tue 12th Mar 2013 13:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: PDF version"
Wondercool
Member since:
2005-07-08

I can't disagree more. The whole idea of advertising is to brainwash you to buy something or to buy a specific brand.

Clearly this brainwashing is working else advertsing would have stopped a very long time ago...

To me it seems that every year humans become more and more a consumer, someone you can sell something to, an economic resource rather than a fellow traveller of life.

I also don't buy into the argument that else 'many sites would disappear as you deprive authors from an income'. Before 2000 most websites including OSNews -still is- were a labour of love, content was good, web design often bad geocity anyone??. After the commercialisation of the net, it's often a dime a dozen.

Just take a look at technology sites: engadget, theverge, ars technica, pocket lint, boy genius report, anand, pcpro uk, wired, slashgear, etc etc.
Now surely they look slightly different and all have a slightly different angle but by large they review the same products. Often their existence is to make money from product announcements by showing (bucket) loads of ads beside the products AND to sell browsing stats to companies (the verge has EIGHT trackers listed by Ghostery).

IMHO it would be extremely welcome if we lose some if not most of these sites, rather sooner than later...

Edited 2013-03-12 13:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: -1