Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Mar 2013 21:44 UTC
Windows Microsoft rolled out a bunch of patches today for Windows 8, and the most important one is that Flash in IE10 now works with a blacklist instead of a whitelist. "Well, the biggest news is that Microsoft has enabled Flash to work now in Internet Explorer 10 for RT. If you recall, Microsoft only allowed a few, specific websites with Flash to work on Internet Explorer 10 citing performance and battery life reasons. There was even a neat little work around that you could do yourself to bypass this. Now, Microsoft have reversed that decision, which they say is due to more sites becoming IE10 compatible." There's a firmware update for Surface RT as well, and I have to admit my Surface RT feels a little faster and smoother - especially typing. Could be reboot-induced, though.
Thread beginning with comment 555320
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[3]: Oh, the arrogance!
by ze_jerkface on Wed 13th Mar 2013 15:37 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Oh, the arrogance!"
ze_jerkface
Member since:
2012-06-22

(2) there are tons of web developers who are too lazy to move away from Flash.


The decision to use Flash isn't normally made by web developers.

It's a business decision made by a manager or director.

If web developers could make those decisions IE6/7 support would have ended ages ago.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Oh, the arrogance!
by Alfman on Thu 14th Mar 2013 20:59 in reply to "RE[3]: Oh, the arrogance!"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

ze_jerkface,

osnews is blocking me from +1'ing you..bah!

Decisions are very often made by managers instead of the developers, I've had my share of brainless management.

Over time, as new technologies ultimately replace flash for serving ads and glitzy animated web content, those who used to complain about flash will learn that the grass isn't always greener on the other side. These annoying elements of the web won't just disappear, people will pay to have them redeveloped into the HTML5 standard where they will be harder to block and probably be just as inefficient for lower power devices.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Oh, the arrogance!
by zima on Fri 15th Mar 2013 18:17 in reply to "RE[4]: Oh, the arrogance!"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

people will pay to have them redeveloped into the HTML5 standard where they will be harder to block and probably be just as inefficient for lower power devices.

I would bet they will be more inefficient. Already now when you compare flash video and HTML5 video on, say, a netbook-class hardware ...HTML5 doesn't deliver better performance at all.

Reply Parent Score: 2