Linked by nej_simon on Wed 13th Mar 2013 23:03 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu On his blog, Mark Shuttleworth has outlined a proposal to change how Canonical handles Ubuntu releases. In the proposal, future LTS releases will receive new kernels and software (something we've already seen in 12.04.2 which had a backported Xorg stack from Quantal) and interim releases will only be supported for 7 months instead of 18. Of course, the current situation where you often have to upgrade the whole OS just to get new software and drivers isn't great, so Canonical might be on to something here.
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Just get the quality right!
by shotsman on Thu 14th Mar 2013 05:08 UTC
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

Recent releases of Ubuntu have been very buggy. I wish that they would concentrate on getting the quality up (as amply described here and in many other forums) rather than fiddling around with this sort of thing.
However given Canonicals desire to be all things to all men (jack of all trades, master of none) I doubt that this will be the case which saddens me.

Ubuntu was once regarded as a breath of fresh air. Releases were solid and eagerly awaited. This is no longer the case and they don't seem to care (from where I sit on the outside)

Reply Score: 4

RE: Just get the quality right!
by kwan_e on Thu 14th Mar 2013 08:39 in reply to "Just get the quality right!"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I wish that they would concentrate on getting the quality up (as amply described here and in many other forums) rather than fiddling around with this sort of thing.


But this sort of thing (rolling release) is about trying to get quality up.

Reply Parent Score: 3

aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

But this sort of thing (rolling release) is about trying to get quality up.
I don't see how a rolling release would bring quality UP?!

My OpenSUSE 12.3 installation isn't perfectly stable and if I wanted something more stable I wouldn't pick something which moved even faster but rather something slower like Debian.

Upgrade what's broken or need security fixes and keep what works. If you replace what works with the latest and greatest you're risking stability.

Reply Parent Score: 2