Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Mar 2013 16:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The Minuum keyboard, through its simplicity, improves your touchscreen typing. Existing keyboards leave you barely enough screen to interact with your apps, and you can't enjoy typing on them. Minuum eliminates the visual clutter of archaic mobile keyboards by adapting the keyboard to a single dimension." You have to watch the video. This is yet another example of a strength of more open platforms - like Android - that often gets overlooked: the ability to experiment with core aspects of the operating system. Whenever someone says there are no Android-exclusive applications, they conveniently overlook things like this. No other platform has stuff like this, and I certainly miss this experimentation on my 8X.
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RE[2]: no no no
by judgen on Mon 18th Mar 2013 19:40 UTC in reply to "RE: no no no"
judgen
Member since:
2006-07-12

I am a huge fan of my 1984 IBM M-series keyboards and i use them almost exclusively. But i agree they can be rather noisy, so sometimes when i need it to be silent but still have that great mechanical feel without any clicking at all i use the ThermalTake Meka full size keyboard.
It is really nice, and just as the M-series it has a full numpad and no annoying windows keys that messes up my typeflow (i know it is just something to get use to, but as i have not, i prefer keyboards without them.)
Also a nice feature is ofcourse the built in USB2.0 hub and the size and weight is just perfect. Beware though, if you use pgUp or pgDn keys, there are none of those either on the Meka, just as there are no "multimedia" keys on any of my keyboards.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: no no no
by ssokolow on Mon 18th Mar 2013 19:46 in reply to "RE[2]: no no no"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Interesting. I bought the Rosewill RK-9000I with Cherry MX Blues rather than a buckling spring keyboard specifically because I wanted Windows keys.

(Model Ms don't have them and Unicomp wanted $50 to ship a $70 keyboard to Canada)

I run Linux and, because no application uses it, my windows key is the basis of every global keyboard shortcut I use (including ones traditionally relegated to media keys like Win+Pause, which toggles play/pause on my media player regardless of focus)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: no no no
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 18th Mar 2013 21:05 in reply to "RE[3]: no no no"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

In this context, what you want and are using is more appropriately called the Meta key. There is no "Windows key" in non-Microsoft operating systems, and most UNIX/UNIX-like systems map those physical keys as Meta keys when when present.

I don't personally use it myself, but you are right that they can be very useful if you like using keyboard shortcuts.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: no no no
by Bobthearch on Tue 19th Mar 2013 00:30 in reply to "RE[2]: no no no"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I am a huge fan of my 1984 IBM M-series keyboards and i use them almost exclusively. But i agree they can be rather noisy...


My favorites are the KeyTronic keyboards that I believe are made by the same company as the old Dell Quiet Key. Good tactile feedback and quick spring action, but without the loud clacking of the famous IBMs. And the Keytronics are easy to find, cost about $10 each, and last forever.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: no no no
by ssokolow on Thu 21st Mar 2013 08:12 in reply to "RE[3]: no no no"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

My favorites are the KeyTronic keyboards that I believe are made by the same company as the old Dell Quiet Key. Good tactile feedback and quick spring action, but without the loud clacking of the famous IBMs. And the Keytronics are easy to find, cost about $10 each, and last forever.


At that price, I'm very curious indeed but there are a lot of results for "Keytronics".

Mind being a little more specific?

Reply Parent Score: 2