Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Mar 2013 16:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The Minuum keyboard, through its simplicity, improves your touchscreen typing. Existing keyboards leave you barely enough screen to interact with your apps, and you can't enjoy typing on them. Minuum eliminates the visual clutter of archaic mobile keyboards by adapting the keyboard to a single dimension." You have to watch the video. This is yet another example of a strength of more open platforms - like Android - that often gets overlooked: the ability to experiment with core aspects of the operating system. Whenever someone says there are no Android-exclusive applications, they conveniently overlook things like this. No other platform has stuff like this, and I certainly miss this experimentation on my 8X.
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RE[4]: Oooh, yay...
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 18th Mar 2013 23:40 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Oooh, yay..."
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

A bhut jolokia is hotter than a banana pepper. I know, because I tried them both. Is that purely anecdotal? If you answer yes, then how about you look it up and read all the scientific stats and findings that back it up, or better yet, try them both yourself?

Similarly with Dvorak, all the information is out there--you just have to look it up. I did, and it is quite fascinating. If you want a site with a more scientific background and analysis of the various keyboard layouts, look up CarpalX.

Martin Krzywinski, the guy behind CarpalX, is a scientist who specializes in bioinformatics and has written a program to assist in making keyboard layouts and testing the efficiency of existing layouts. So I think It's safe to say that this guy takes things seriously and looks at things from as scientific a standpoint as you could possibly get.

Edited 2013-03-18 23:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Oooh, yay...
by No it isnt on Tue 19th Mar 2013 08:33 in reply to "RE[4]: Oooh, yay..."
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Comparing the hotness of peppers is all about comparing the subjective experience (taste). The validity of any objective scale of taste can only be tested through repeated intersubjective verification. The subjective taste is actually the gold standard here. Of course, one also has to eliminate for bias through blind tasting, even though bias arguably is part of the experience.

I've looked at a few scientific studies of keyboard layouts (just the newer ones found with Google Scholar). Two of them found a speed advantage of 4% to Dvorak, which is amazingly small considering the propaganda. The gain hardly makes up for the months needed for retraining.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Oooh, yay...
by UltraZelda64 on Tue 19th Mar 2013 10:14 in reply to "RE[5]: Oooh, yay..."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

No, actually it is the subjectiveness or individual tolerance to capsaicinoids, taste is not quite where the heat comes from. But that's not the point; the point was, if you'd read just a bit deeper you'd find out about things like high-performance liquid chromatography, which is a fancy 'scientific' way to find the actual heat level at the source--through the testing the pepper to find the actual amount of capsaicin for that pepper. It can go much deeper than the original way to obtain the scoville ratings, which was just having a panel of people eat one and see how it goes--subjectively.

It's the same here. There is plenty written of keyboard layouts beyond the purely obviously subjective, and it's not too difficult to separate facts from subjectivity. And even then, who's to say that every subjective statement is automatically 'wrong'? They may have just not been fully tested in a completely scientific way yet, but there's plenty of facts out there that can be obtained from various sources to help you come to your own conclusion. And unless someone plans to pay for an extensive scientific study, the best evidence is probably just trying it yourself.

By the way if speed is all you care about, then stick with what you know--Dvorak may or may not help you there. But the layout has many other advantages, including comfort, that I'd put above speed in importance. What good is raw speed when you have to murder your wrists to obtain it? I admit, I always thought the speed claims were some of Dvorak's more questionable ones, although in theory I can see how it may be possible. Eventually I may find out for myself.

Edited 2013-03-19 10:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1