Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Mar 2013 21:06 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Change platforms. Whenever you can. Ever since I got into computing, I've lived according to a very simple adage: change platforms all the time. For reasons I won't go into, the importance of this adage was reaffirmed today, and I figured I'd share it with you all - and hopefully, get a few of you to follow this adage as well.
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RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by ssokolow on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 09:21 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

I'll advise to start with F#/Scala/Ocaml/Clojure before going into Haskell and Common Lisp.

Since the former have more industry acceptance, you might even be able to use them on a day job.


I actually ran across F# in some examples of using continuations with special syntax to write synchronous-looking asynchronous code and it does look like an interesting language but I haven't quite gotten over my irrational dislike of .NET.

(Among other things, I take offense at seeing .exe and .dll files outside my WINEPREFIX)

I do have Mono installed for something else though, so maybe I'll give F#'s compile-to-Javascript option a try some time.

Similar issue with Scala and Clojure. I hate the Java language and don't like the OpenJDK JVM's approach to memory consumption, but I do have it installed to run TraNG.

I suppose I could drop Ocaml in ahead of Common LISP on my TODO list but I really want to learn Haskell first... partly because I want to do some Bluetile/XMonad hacking.

If I remember correctly, Stackless Python has continuations.


Yes, but I've yet to use Stackless in practice. It's sort of a chicken and egg problem. Can't justify a tricky dependency like Stackless without a solid use case, can't learn solid use cases without experience. (You can't apt-get or emerge it and I seriously doubt the PyPI packages for it are reliable and mature options)

Hence why it'd probably be easier to get experience in a language where support IS part of the main official implementation.

I have been working toward making PyPy a supported target for my creations, though, so I'll have to see how many platforms offer it built to support stackless functionality.

Edited 2013-03-22 09:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510
by moondevil on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 15:13 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

As a polyglot developer, I tend to have a mercenary point of view in regard to operating systems and languages.

I'll use whatever our customers require in their request for proposal.

But to each its own, so learn what you feel more comfortable with as the main goal is to learn something different.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by MOS6510
by ssokolow on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 20:08 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by MOS6510"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

As a polyglot developer, I tend to have a mercenary point of view in regard to operating systems and languages.

I'll use whatever our customers require in their request for proposal.

But to each its own, so learn what you feel more comfortable with as the main goal is to learn something different.


I have a similar viewpoint... within the set of languages I currently feel skilled enough at to charge for.

Currently, that set'd be Python, PHP, JavaScript, CoffeeScript, Bourne Shell Script, HTML, CSS, and, depending on the requirements, maybe C, C++, and Vala. (Yeah, HTML and CSS aren't programming languages, but they can still be horribly abused if you don't understand them properly)

Reply Parent Score: 2