Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 14:20 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu This could potentially be quite big for Ubuntu and Linux in general. Canonical and the Chinese government have announced a collaboration to build a version of Ubuntu specifically for the Chinese market, which will become the reference architecture for standard operating systems in the country.
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RE[2]: Comment by kwan_e
by BeamishBoy on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 15:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by kwan_e"
BeamishBoy
Member since:
2010-10-27

That should be an improvement then. The Chinese govt. only changes once every 10 years. As it is Ubuntu and most desktop Linux distros tend to break every single update. 10 years of stability is enterprise level stuff that you only get with the likes of RHEL/CentOS.


You're going to be down-voted to all hell for daring to say this. (I'm about to join you.)

However, this is my experience as well. I've only ever managed a single successful upgrade from one version of Ubuntu to the next (12.04 -> 12.10); every other one has left the machine in an unusable state. I'm even wary of ordinary package updates since the fact that I use NVidia's own drivers often conflicts with kernel updates.

Of course, that's probably my own fault for being so unreasonable as to expect to have hardware-accelerated graphics.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by kwan_e
by sicofante on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 21:05 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by kwan_e"
sicofante Member since:
2009-07-08

Running Ubuntu on a old Macbook here (Core Duo, 32 bit). Today's kernel update left the system unable to boot. I still can boot with the previous kernel version. It's not the first time this has happened in the last year. They call this "stable". :-(

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by kwan_e
by leech on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 22:35 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kwan_e"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Debian is your friend... I don't know how Ubuntu takes such a stable base that is pretty flawless as far as upgrades go (I upgraded from Sarge(during testing) to Etch, to Lenny to Squeeze, and the only thing that broke was some php code I had that was obsoleted due to PHP being updated. Which of course is PHP's fault.)

I finally ended up doing a fresh install of Squeeze because it was easier to convert my system to amd64. Granted it was 'possible' to go from i386 to amd64, but just I just figured I could clean up some cruft as well.

Ubuntu.. I agree, it seems to break randomly just between normal updates.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by kwan_e
by AdrianoML on Sat 23rd Mar 2013 00:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by kwan_e"
AdrianoML Member since:
2010-08-13

>I use NVidia's own drivers often conflicts with kernel updates.

I Guess you're installing it manually from the vendor site/installer? These are not meant for end-user usage since you must manually update then every kernel update. You should be using the Canonical supplied one, which is automatically updated every kernel update, and shouldn't break unless something very funky is happening.

You're probably thinking with a Windows mindset where you must check the vendor site in order to keep drivers update (arguably nowadays most are kept updated with Windows update). In Linux the kernel either supports everything out of the box or the distro takes care of providing support for proprietary drivers. Doing it manually is pretty much advanced users only, and asking for trouble.

Also, I don't know about Ubuntu upgrading conditions, but my ArchLinux install has been alive and up to date since it's inception in 2009. It even handled a full upgrade from 32bit to 64bit, without reinstalling!

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[4]: Comment by kwan_e
by Laurence on Sat 23rd Mar 2013 15:13 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kwan_e"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


>I use NVidia's own drivers often conflicts with kernel updates.

I Guess you're installing it manually from the vendor site/installer? These are not meant for end-user usage since you must manually update then every kernel update. You should be using the Canonical supplied one, which is automatically updated every kernel update, and shouldn't break unless something very funky is happening.

You say that, but only today I've had the same problem as him. Like yourself, I run Arch and installing the drivers from official Repos.

My issue was that the Nvidia binaries were compiled against a specific version of ABIs which were updated with Linux. I ended up having to rollback the updates.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by kwan_e
by oskeladden on Sat 23rd Mar 2013 00:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by kwan_e"
oskeladden Member since:
2009-08-05

You're going to be down-voted to all hell for daring to say this. (I'm about to join you.)


This Linux fan up voted the comment, because it made me laugh. We have more of a sense of humour than you give us credit for.

Reply Parent Score: 2