Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 09:56 UTC
In the News If you don't live in the US, this is a pretty common source of irritation: US companies charging crazy markups on products sold in Europe, Asia, Australia, South America, and the rest of the world. The Australian government has had enough of this practice, and started an inquiry into the matter. Yesterday (or today? Timezones confuse me) Apple, Microsoft, and Adobe had to answer questions in a public hearing.
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RE[2]: Comment by docc
by WorknMan on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 16:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by docc"
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

How is this different from any other business? It's not like they are running a charity.


Yeah, I love when the article says:

other countries are facing the same high markups from US technology companies, and it mostly seems to be a case of pricing whatever they can get away with.

What, you mean a business is charging as much as the market will bear for it's product? OMFG, how dare they!?!?! LMAO, I know liberals are dumb, but sometimes their stupidity is truly astounding.

So just in case you jackasses don't get it, here's a hint for you.... if you don't like what they're charging for their products, then don't buy them!! See how easy that was? These companies don't need to justify what they're charging; it's not like they have a monopoly on water, for fuck's sake.

And anyway, people around here are always extolling the virtues of open source software, and how superior it is to the commercial/proprietary stuff. So why do you need anything from Microsoft or Adobe? I'm sure Linux has every thing you could ever want ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by docc
by acobar on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 17:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by docc"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

Hum, let me see, if a big company sells to another country goodies for a price below what it charges in its native country to conquer market, it is dumping but the other way around is perfectly fine! I got to love your sense of "free market"!

People here are not complaining about the "value" associated to products but to a practice that is, like dumping, unfair tn a very desirable competitive market, i.e., rights to dictate who can sell their products and for how much on different countries. This is harmful to the society interest. The only reason it exist is because big companies "bribe" their way to get such nefarious authorizations approved.

Clearly, the only viable solution would be extinguish this kind of uneven power. If you sell in your market any company should have the right to buy there and resell on their own country. Case closed for books/electronics/medicine/etc heinous abuse.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by docc
by WorknMan on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 21:22 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by docc"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Clearly, the only viable solution would be extinguish this kind of uneven power. If you sell in your market any company should have the right to buy there and resell on their own country. Case closed for books/electronics/medicine/etc heinous abuse.


You heard about the recent supreme court case that ruled against Wiley & Sons? That's kind of exactly what happened ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by docc
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 25th Mar 2013 18:29 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by docc"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

While the parent was rude and disrespectful, his core point was pretty valid from a free market standpoint.

"Dumping" would be perfectly ok in a truly free market.

The free market solution to this problem, is either of your solutions. Increased competition, or middle men that can profit on the price differential.

"fairness" isn't in the vocabulary of free markets.

For the record, I'm more of a fan of regulated markets. I'd prefer stability of markets over wild swings, even at the expense of total gdp over a long stretch of time.

Reply Parent Score: 2