Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Mar 2013 09:56 UTC
In the News If you don't live in the US, this is a pretty common source of irritation: US companies charging crazy markups on products sold in Europe, Asia, Australia, South America, and the rest of the world. The Australian government has had enough of this practice, and started an inquiry into the matter. Yesterday (or today? Timezones confuse me) Apple, Microsoft, and Adobe had to answer questions in a public hearing.
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lustyd
Member since:
2008-06-19

Yeah I hear that Vorbis is going to really take off any time now. I think there might even be someone who's heard of it without being a nerd now...oh wait no, apparently they were thinking of a vortex it still is just hopeful geeks and everyone else uses standard formats.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Yeah I hear that Vorbis is going to really take off any time now. I think there might even be someone who's heard of it without being a nerd now...oh wait no, apparently they were thinking of a vortex it still is just hopeful geeks and everyone else uses standard formats.


It matters not that vorbis did not gain huge visibility amongst the general populace, the fact remains there does exist a large amount of material encoded in vorbis audio and webm.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:File_types

http://gigaom.com/2011/04/19/youtube-webm-transcodes/

On an Apple device one cannot render this material. On an Android device, one can:

http://developer.android.com/guide/appendix/media-formats.html

Both vorbis and VP8 (and therefore webm) are a defined part of the Android Supported Media Formats.

The majority of the latest generation of ARM SoCs fully support the Android Supported Media Formats:

http://wiki.webmproject.org/hardware/arm-socs

For that matter, there is also the Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC) to consider:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_hardware_and_software_that_sup...

FLAC is not natively supported on the iOS platform, including all "iDevices". This is especially true of iTunes software on such devices, where FLAC is not supported, with Apple only offering native support for their own similar ALAC lossless audio format.

As with their iOS operating system, Apple's iTunes software on OS X cannot natively playback FLAC audio files.

Native support for FLAC was added to the Android operating system starting from the 3.1 'Honeycomb' update.


What a surprise, hey! iOS is falling a long way behind in media support. This is a bit strange, because it is not as though it would actually cost Apple anything to provide their users with support for vorbis, VP8, webm, FLAC and the like. No, it would seem it is more of the case that Apple just wants users to pay more for multimedia than they need to.

Edited 2013-03-25 03:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

lustyd Member since:
2008-06-19

iOS is not falling behind at all. Apple have chosen not to support hundreds of codecs just for the sake of it. ITunes will recode anything you want on the device into a standard format so the ability of the device to playback oddball files makes no difference. Yes, there may be quite a few of these files around, but those numbers are completely dwarfed by the MP3, MPEG2 and MPEG4 numbers which everyone who isn't a Linux nerd has standardised on, making the numbers you're talking about considerably less than 1% or the total. I'm unaware of any store selling legal vorbis tracks, or any source of legal VP8 movies - I'm talking about studio created content here rather than people in their bedrooms setting up shop.

Reply Parent Score: 3