Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Mar 2013 10:45 UTC
General Development "Programming is hard. Don't ever feel bad because you aren't as good at 'just googling it' as the person next to you. Don't ever let hackathon snobs talk you out of creating the next Twitter for cats or Yelp for public washrooms. Even the dumbest ideas (like trying to make animated polygons disappear and reappear) will help you improve as a programmer. Learning to program is largely about learning to learn - and the best way to learn is to do." For some reason, I love this short story.
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RE[2]: Programmers
by progormre on Wed 27th Mar 2013 16:39 UTC in reply to "RE: Programmers"
progormre
Member since:
2012-05-20

I've seen tasks countless of times that could be solved elegantly or quick with a nasty hack. Management always goes for the later as long that is a possibility. I don't see any problems with that. Don't see any problem with nasty code either, if I can add another hack and I'm told to do so, I'll do it, if I can not then I'll just tell them that it must be rewritten. Of course I would have explained that eventually the code must be rewritten when the amount of hacks gets to hard to grasp. Then it's up to them to judge whether they can foot the bill now or gamble on paying through their nose later. This is a lot more professional compared to a difficult to deal with programmer who refuses anything but an elegant solution, to me such guys have no place in a business.

So, I understand sloppy commercial code, I do not understand sloppy open source code though, in fact it makes me blush. How can you possibly justify that?

Edited 2013-03-27 16:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Programmers
by Alfman on Wed 27th Mar 2013 17:44 in reply to "RE[2]: Programmers"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

progormre,

"Then it's up to them to judge whether they can foot the bill now or gamble on paying through their nose later. This is a lot more professional compared to a difficult to deal with programmer who only refuses anything but an elegant solution, to me such guys have no place in a business."


I've seen that too, but it's not exactly the same as what I'm talking about here. I'm talking about bad and/or inexperienced developers. It's not right to imply that doing something fast & doing it well are inherently conflicting goals. Good software engineers should understand that the larger and more complex a problem is, the more important it becomes to build a good foundation, which will actually yield results sooner than a foundation built on spaghetti code where everyone is stepping on each other's feet and changes need to be made in dozens of places to implement anything.

Most web development projects probably start out as tiny and vague in comparison to corporate projects. This may explain why so little design appears to go into many web projects, which frequently devolve into a mess of spaghetti code. It's just a shame that even for small projects, some developers are so bad that they'll use a nasty hack even when they could have used nice code for the same effort.

Edited 2013-03-27 17:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Programmers
by Delgarde on Thu 28th Mar 2013 01:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Programmers"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

This is a lot more professional compared to a difficult to deal with programmer who refuses anything but an elegant solution, to me such guys have no place in a business.


While I'd agree with that comment in general, I'd note that as the person having to maintain the collection of hacks in the future, I'll be pushing very, very hard to have them fixed properly every time.

Quick hacks are fine to deliver a short-term fix under tight time frames (e.g security issues, production environments crashing, etc), but I'd hate to work for a company where "fix it properly" wasn't the highest priority as soon as the quick fix is out the door.

Reply Parent Score: 2