Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Mar 2013 23:33 UTC
Windows "According to Kevin Restivo, an analyst at IDC, the countries where Windows Phone shipments exceeded those of iPhone during the fourth quarter were: Argentina, India, Poland, Russia, South Africa and Ukraine. A seventh 'country' where Windows Phone shipments beat iPhone is actually a group of smaller countries, including Croatia, that IDC lumps together in a category called 'rest of central and eastern Europe'." Not bad. Unsurprisingly, these are Nokia countries.
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RE: Comment by przemo_li
by cdude on Thu 28th Mar 2013 08:35 UTC in reply to "Comment by przemo_li"
cdude
Member since:
2008-09-21

Recent news say starting this Q1 quarter Nokia pays $40 for each sold device for the WP license to Microsoft. Minimum $250 million each quarter. The quarters before they got $250 million each quarter from Microsoft. That makes it minus $500 million each quarter they have on top now and no headquarters, land left to sell. Siemens leaving NSN and Huawei as new WP low-end Microsoft partner are hitting in too.

That limits how far low they can go. Also till today Nokia makes lose with each sold unit including high end Lumia's. Going future down and increasing number of sold devices may not help them in becoming profitable again and they not have much time and money left.

Watch out, its an end-game. The 3-No's are going to be completed. Nortel, Novel, Nokia. All exclusive strategic Microsoft partners that went all in, all gone.

Edited 2013-03-28 08:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by przemo_li
by unclefester on Thu 28th Mar 2013 09:33 in reply to "RE: Comment by przemo_li"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Recent news say starting this Q1 quarter Nokia pays $40 for each sold device for the WP license to Microsoft. Minimum $250 million each quarter. The quarters before they got $250 million each quarter from Microsoft. That makes it minus $500 million each quarter they have on top now and no headquarters, land left to sell. Siemens leaving NSN and Huawei as new WP low-end Microsoft partner are hitting in too.


Paying a licence fee of $40 is far cheaper than hiring thousands of developers.

Nokia has a thriving and extremely profitable network business.

Most large companies don't own their own headquarters - or any other real estate.

That limits how far low they can go. Also till today Nokia makes lose with each sold unit including high end Lumia's. Going future down and increasing number of sold devices may not help them in becoming profitable again and they not have much time and money left.


WP8 is super responsive on hardware that can barely run Android ICS. This means that Nokia can sell extremely cheap hardware at premium prices. Nokia WP8 phones cost 50-100% more than Android phones with similar hardware.


Watch out, its an end-game. The 3-No's are going to be completed. Nortel, Novel, Nokia. All exclusive strategic Microsoft partners that went all in, all gone.


Considering that MS has effectively bought Nokia there is no real danger of Nokia going broke.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by przemo_li
by cdude on Thu 28th Mar 2013 14:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by przemo_li"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

Paying a licence fee of $40 is far cheaper than hiring thousands of developers.

Owning and controlling your own future is invaluable and so is not depending on Microsoft's good will only.

WP8 is super responsive on hardware that can barely run Android ICS. This means that Nokia can sell extremely cheap hardware at premium prices

And so can, and does, Huawei, HTC and Samsung. All of them have the same WP8. Samsung and HTC seem to have given up on WP8, Huawei's bestseller are there Android's (same Hardware like there WP8).

MS has effectively bought Nokia

While not paying a dime and even getting money from Nokia now. $40 for each sold unit, that is double as much Samsung had to pay for there WP licenses. Clever.

there is no real danger of Nokia going broke.

Not broke, they will be cut into pieces and parts, like there patents still worth some $, be sold to Microsoft and others.

Edited 2013-03-28 14:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by przemo_li
by tylerdurden on Thu 28th Mar 2013 19:11 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by przemo_li"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


Paying a licence fee of $40 is far cheaper than hiring thousands of developers.


It depends on the development costs, volume shipments, and what not.


Nokia has a thriving and extremely profitable network business.


Which would be great if that was their bread and butter, but it isn't. Nokia also used to have thriving shoe making business, alas we're talking about the cell phone market...


Most large companies don't own their own headquarters - or any other real estate.


Another silly generalization based in you confusing your perception with reality. Most companies that can afford it, prefer or tend to own their real estate. Why? Because ASSETS (value of owned real estate) look much much better than EXPENDITURES (leasing costs) on the books. Accounting 101 really.

However, companies with liquidity problems are forced to cannibalize their assets when they can't generate enough revenue via product sales/shipments. This is what Nokia was forced to do. Context makes a huuuuuuge difference.


WP8 is super responsive on hardware that can barely run Android ICS. This means that Nokia can sell extremely cheap hardware at premium prices. Nokia WP8 phones cost 50-100% more than Android phones with similar hardware.


Who needs quantitative facts when one can just pull qualitative arguments our of their derriere, right?

Considering that MS has effectively bought Nokia...


That would be news for both MS and Nokia, you should contact them and let'em know...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by przemo_li
by moondevil on Fri 29th Mar 2013 09:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by przemo_li"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Nokia has a thriving and extremely profitable network business.


Yeah, that is the surely the reason why my unit was terminated in 2008. We were just in the way of such profits.


Most large companies don't own their own headquarters - or any other real estate.


Except on NSN's case it was sold, because the running costs were too high.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by przemo_li
by bnolsen on Fri 29th Mar 2013 14:27 in reply to "RE: Comment by przemo_li"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

will we start to see nokia finally shipping android units like everyone else? All they really need to do is provide a stock version of android with no crap and they would do well. Unless MS has some major grip on them still going into android would give them much needed diversity, access to a large established market and very possibly even more much needed leverage on MS.

One definition of insanity is to keep repeating what doesn't work. Nokia seems to have discovered the formula for losing almost all their once dominant marketshare in the fastest expanding market in history and they still seem to be stubbornly persuing the same strategy.

Edited 2013-03-29 14:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1