Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th Mar 2013 01:42 UTC
3D News, GL, DirectX "Today, we are excited to unlock this technology for high-performance games, by teaming up with Epic Games. By leveraging this new JavaScript optimization technology, Mozilla has been able to bring Epic's Unreal Engine 3 to the Web. With this port, developers will soon be able to explore limitless possibilities when it comes to porting their popular gaming titles to the Web."
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RE[2]: Adobe already did this...
by henderson101 on Thu 28th Mar 2013 14:26 UTC in reply to "RE: Adobe already did this..."
henderson101
Member since:
2006-05-30

Which Flash plug-in are you using? Because it requires an extremely recent one to work correctly. That is the major drawback. The multithreading doesn't work well without the correct plug-in, and the single threaded runtime is a lot slower.

I admit, this isn't for everyone. But, it works really well, well enough to run Quake 1 with SDL in an XP virtual machine on a Windows 7 laptop with no lag what so ever. And remember - this isn't a target you have to do a lot of extra work with - the majority of your C and C++ code should work out of the box, so long as you use SDL or one of the other supported frameworks for the graphics. No one is stopping you from porting another tool kit too. That beats javascript every time for me personally. Your mileage might vary.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sgtrock Member since:
2011-05-13

Quake 1? That's a really low bar considering that Q3Arena has been available on QuakeLive for several years. I should hope that they could make Q1 run well!

Reply Parent Score: 2

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

It was more as a demonstration of how the technology worked. The main "thing" was the fact that they had the Unreal engine compiling with Flascc and running natively in Flash *last* year.

Plus you get that this was running in a VM, right? So my laptop was running a VM with 2GB of RAM in VMWare running Flash running Quake 1 that I had just compiled from source using the Flascc compiler... that was what blew me away, not the fact that they had ported Quake 1. The performance in that fairly extreme test (emulating 32bit Windows in a VM under 64bit Windows 7) with really good results.

Edited 2013-03-28 14:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Savior Member since:
2006-09-02

That beats javascript every time for me personally. Your mileage might vary.


Unfortunately, there are rather large groups of people, who cannot choose their own mileage: iOS users, Linux users, and I'm not even sure if Flash is supported on Android anymore. So HTLM5+JS may be worse, but that's the only platform-agnostic way that's left.

As for my mileage: I hate both; but I still can't wait until this makes it to Firefox stable.

Reply Parent Score: 4

0brad0 Member since:
2007-05-05


Unfortunately, there are rather large groups of people, who cannot choose their own mileage: iOS users, Linux users, and I'm not even sure if Flash is supported on Android anymore. So HTLM5+JS may be worse, but that's the only platform-agnostic way that's left.


Flash was never even close to being platform-agnostic. Unless you're running Windows then Flash run-time availability is completely hit or miss and tends to be quite a buggy experience even on the "supported" OS's never mind the issue of not being available at all or not up to date.

Edited 2013-03-29 01:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3