Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 1st Apr 2013 12:25 UTC
Apple "Last Friday, The Verge revealed the existence of a dead-simple URL-based hack that allowed anyone to reset your Apple ID password with just your email address and date of birth. Apple quickly shut down the site and closed the security hole before bringing it back online. The conventional wisdom is that this was a run-of-the-mill software security issue. [...] It isn't. It's a troubling symptom that suggests Apple's self-admittedly bumpy transition from a maker of beautiful devices to a fully-fledged cloud services provider still isn't going smoothly. Meanwhile, your Apple ID password has come a long way from the short string of characters you tap to update apps on your iPhone. It now offers access to Apple's entire ecosystem of devices, stores, software, and services."
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Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

galvanash,


"Now that you point it out there is an obvious security issue on the account preferences page. There is a reason most such system require the user to re-enter their existing password in order to change it..."

Yea, there are vulnerabilities on several pages, which you can probably find if you poke around with an eye for them. I'd like to discuss them because they're common web problems, but so far they haven't responded and I feel guilty pointing them out before they're fixed. It's probably unlikely anyone will fix them before this article times out.


"That said, osnews.com is not Apple - I think it is fair to hold them to a slightly higher standard."


Haha, I've read this sentence several times now and it's not semantically clear at all which one you are holding to a higher standard ;)

Edit: Often companies are lazy at fixing both known and unknown vulnerabilities until the exploits for them are in the wild. This is probably why many security researches end up being frustrated with "proper channels" and publish their exploits, which forces companies to promptly fix their stuff. What are osnews reader's opinions on the morality of public disclosure of security vulnerabilities?

Edited 2013-04-02 01:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

"That said, osnews.com is not Apple - I think it is fair to hold them to a slightly higher standard."


Haha, I've read this sentence several times now and it's not semantically clear at all which one you are holding to a higher standard ;)


I meant that it seems fair to me to hold Apple to a higher standard, but point taken - I did word that poorly.

What are osnews reader's opinions on the morality of public disclosure of security vulnerabilities?


I think in this case public disclosure is more than fair - the problem is so obvious it is in fact announcing itself...

ps. If you really want to get Thom's attention send him a link to the exploit in an email... Just tell him what you are going to change his password to first ;)

Edited 2013-04-02 02:34 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

galvanash,

"ps. If you really want to get Thom's attention send him a link to the exploit in an email... Just tell him what you are going to change his password to"

That's actually what I did. The exploit I used was a bit more sophisticated than redirected form submission - it takes over control of the user session in an iframe (which is the reason it was browser dependent) and passes control to another server.


This year one of my clients was attacked with one of the most sophisticated PHP attacks I had seen to date. Malicious code was uploaded on one website through an image upload form, propagated to another website through background mirroring jobs, and exploited on that second website. The code was self obfuscating and ultimately extracted and installed a PHP trojan which was used to conduct an attack on another third party server (who accused us of hacking them).

Reply Parent Score: 2